MINI Cooper Forum - FAQ & DIY: Exterior Styling and Modifications
Go Back   MINI Cooper Forum > FAQ & DIY > MINI DIY & FAQ - FIRST GENERATION


Mini2.com is the premier Mini Cooper Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Search FAQ Search FAQ
Search Word(s):
Matching Options:
Search in:

How to retrofit side marker or wheel arch lights (US style)

The front arch corners are held on with 2 phillips / cross head screws each, then they just clip off

MINI Diy MINI Diy

Rears also have 2 screws (top one hidden by the upper arch which is clipped on)

MINI Diy MINI Diy

Old arches shown with new arches

MINI Diy MINI Diy

These arches & lights were supplied with plugs by the dealer

MINI Diy

With no pins, wires were pushed though the plugs then bent over the front of the plug (away from each other).
The plugs were then pushed into the sockets on the lights. Glue was used down the back of the holes in the plus to secure the wires.

MINI Diy MINI Diy MINI Diy

The wires must then be routed to the connection points. Front easily pushes through to the back of the front sidelight.
Connect 1 wire to each of the wires on the side light bulb holder. (Either way round its not polarity concious)

MINI Diy MINI Diy

For the rears, remove the rear lights (1 10mm nut each) Inside the cavity you will see a grommet, make a small slit & pass the wire through. (the right side has a larger grommet than the left.) Seal the grommet using silicone.
Once the wire is in the rear cavity, connect to the rear light wiring.
The car I worked on the colours were Brown, and grey/yellow. Once the wires have been passed though, the arches can be clipped on & screwed.

MINI Diy

Job done:

MINI Diy MINI Diy MINI Diy MINI Diy MINI Diy

Thanks to Mikeythemini of NewMINIStuff.com for the DIY. They also sell retrofit kits.


How to fit 'S' side skirts to a Cooper or One
DISCLAIMER:

The information below is based on the account of a MINI2 member. Although MINI2 and the author of this thread believe this information is accurate, using it as a DIY guide is done at your own risk. MINI2 and the author are not responsible for any damage, personal injury, or warranty issues that may arise from the use of this information. Some information below may be specific to model specifications that are unique to certain countries, and may not apply to your model of MINI One, Cooper, or Cooper S.

Do not undertake any DIY project that you are not qualified to perform. If you have questions about this project, you should consult with experienced professionals and/or your MINI dealer before undertaking it. Always follow standard safety guidelines for car repair in performing DIY projects.


Parts Diagram and List:



Note:
  • No. 6 clips are included with new side skirts but usually must be purchased for used side skirts
  • No. 7 clips (same as above)
  • No. 8 clips are often damaged during removal of old side skirts so purchase new ones
  • No. 9 rivets are reusable after removal of old side skirts
Do-It-Yourself instructions and pictures follow.

If you plan to sell, or to keep your standard sills for possible future re-use, I suggest you protect them whilst cutting as shown below. Use a long "break-off" bladed knife with a brand new (ie. sharp) blade. Once you get started they cut through really easily.

Once the sill plate is off, the four plastic studs are revealed underneath. These need to be pried out.

You then move to the underside and undo all the screw clips - these are re-usable.

Then for the fun bit! You just get hold of the sill at one end or the other and just pull! You will hear all the fixing clips break off as you do so - this is fine, they are not designed for re-use and the new skirt comes with new ones already fitted.

The old broken clips can be removed from the body by turning them a quarter-turn (although one or two of them are a little more awkward and need a bit of fiddling to remove).

The "nude" sill area looks like this:

You're then ready to fit the new sills. Just line up the clips with the holes and push firmly until they click into place. You need to make sure that the sill overlaps the bottom of the rear wheel-arch liner properly.

Also, try to get as good a fit as possible at the rear of the door opening where the sill is shaped around the in-and-outs. There is some lateral movement possible (front to back) to enable this, before all the top and bottom clips are fixed.

Then just replace the various clips on the bottom and fit the new studs in the top and replace the sill plate using suitable double-sided tape (this tape needs to be thin, but spongy - some people have mentioned a 3M branded tape - I used one by "Autobar DL Products Ltd" from my local accessories shop).

Whilst you can probably get way without cleaning the residue of the old tape off of the sill plates, I cleaned mine up first, using a decorators Stanley blade type scraper, as per this picture:

Once everything is back together again, you'll realise just how worthwhile - and easy - the whole job was.

One last picture of the finished job!

Tips from Cooperama:
  1. Use a sharp, thin-bladed knife to get under the sill plates plus a hairdryer / heat gun to really loosen the tape holding them down.
  2. Use white spirit to soak the residue from the double-sided tape on the back of the sill plates before scraping it off.
  3. Don't lose the self-tapping screw securing the skirt to the rear wheel arch on each side ... its not on the parts list above.
  4. Once you have pulled the old skirt off, the clip where the door pillar curves around to meet the sill may be a struggle to remove ... you cant just rotate it to remove it. Dont worry if you break it off inside the sill, there are a couple of rubber bungs in the sill which can be carefully removed and you should be able to retrieve any bits of clip within reach.
  5. Check the clips before sliding them into the locating lugs on the back of the skirt ... there are little lugs on them and they only slide in properly when this lines up with the cut-out in the lug. This will ensure they are aligned with the holes in the sill.
Tip from Cook1e:

"S" side skirts from a Hardtop can be fitted to a Convertible by making modifications to clear the suspension brace bar that is fitted to the convertible between the underside of the sill and rear suspension. A large hole about 41mm in diameter needs to be drilled using a hole saw cutter and a slot needs to be carefully cut using a jigsaw or hacksaw. The easiest way to mark up the replacement sill cover is to make a cardboard template up using the old side skirt as a guide.

Contact DIY Author

How to fit an 'S' fuel cap to a Cooper or One

DISCLAIMER:

The information below is based on the account of a MINI2 member. Although MINI2 and the author of this thread believe this information is accurate, using it as a DIY guide is done at your own risk. MINI2 and the author are not responsible for any damage, personal injury, or warranty issues that may arise from the use of this information. Some information below may be specific to model specifications that are unique to certain countries, and may not apply to your model of MINI One, Cooper, or Cooper S.

Do not undertake any DIY project that you are not qualified to perform. If you have questions about this project, you should consult with experienced professionals and/or your MINI dealer before undertaking it. Always follow standard safety guidelines for car repair in performing DIY projects.


The following parts are required:

51 17 7 076 054 - Body Trim Ring
51 17 7 076 055 - Chrome Cap
51 17 7 077 534 - Hinge
51 13 0 142 338 - Set Screw

While these parts can be ordered from a MINI dealer, an aftermarket vendor like MiniMania [MiniSpares] or RSpeed may sell them as a kit cheaper.

Some pictures of an installation follow, further instructions coming soon.

The body trim ring needs to be painted. The part number for the two [color and clear] paint set is:

51 91 0 138 XXX (where XXX denotes body color)

Body trim ring and hinge installed ...

The finished product ...




Contact DIY Author


How to fit 'clear' front indicator bulbs and 'whiter' side lights

DISCLAIMER:

The information below is based on the account of a MINI2 member. Although MINI2 and the author of this thread believe this information is accurate, using it as a DIY guide is done at your own risk. MINI2 and the author are not responsible for any damage, personal injury, or warranty issues that may arise from the use of this information. Some information below may be specific to model specifications that are unique to certain countries, and may not apply to your model of MINI One, Cooper, or Cooper S.

Do not undertake any DIY project that you are not qualified to perform. If you have questions about this project, you should consult with experienced professionals and/or your MINI dealer before undertaking it. Always follow standard safety guidelines for car repair in performing DIY projects.


This DIY guide shows you how to install Philips 'Blue Vision' side light bulbs (for a whiter, less 'yellow' light) and Philips 'Silver Vision' indicator bulbs (to remove the 'fried egg' effect of the standard orange bulbs).

Time estimate: 15 to 20 minutes max.
Skill level: novice.
Tools required: Your hands, possibly some rubber gloves to avoid scraped knuckles!

There are several suppliers of these bulbs, we bought ours from www.PowerBulbs.com. Who ship worldwide free of charge.

Note that the car shown is fitted with Halogen headlamps. The improvements made by this modification are even better for cars with the MINI 'Xenon' lights fitted, which produce more of a blue light than the halogens.

First of all, you will have to flip the hood (bonnet) and remove the standard bulbs. For this DIY I changed the sidelights first.

This is the view of the rear of the bulb housing:


[Click thumnail to enlarge]

Both the sidelight and indicator housing twist and pull out.
The arrows indicate the correct direction to remove. They may be a little stiff.

First I removed the sidelight:


[Click thumnail to enlarge]

Then plugged in the new Blue Vision bulb. The bulb appears 'blue' when not lit, but produces a white light.


[Click thumnail to enlarge]

Re-fitting is just a case of push and twist.

This image shows the before and after (one side completed) of the Blue Vision sidelight install:


[Click thumnail to enlarge]

Next to remove the indicator housing, this is slightly easier because it has a larger housing, and is therefore easier to twist out. There is less room for fingers though!


[Click thumnail to enlarge]

Then, replace with the Philips 'Silver Vision' bulb:


[Click thumnail to enlarge]

Again, simply replace the indicator housing the opposite way to removal.

Repeat for the other side, and that's it!

A very worth while modification!


[Click thumnail to enlarge]


[Click thumnail to enlarge]


[Click thumnail to enlarge]


[Click thumnail to enlarge]


Contact DIY Author


How to use inoperable rear fog lamps as extra brake lights (USA/Canada)
DISCLAIMER:

The information below is based on the account of a MINI2 member. Although MINI2 and the author of this thread believe this information is accurate, using it as a DIY guide is done at your own risk. MINI2 and the author are not responsible for any damage, personal injury, or warranty issues that may arise from the use of this information. Some information below may be specific to model specifications that are unique to certain countries, and may not apply to your model of MINI One, Cooper, or Cooper S.

Do not undertake any DIY project that you are not qualified to perform. If you have questions about this project, you should consult with experienced professionals and/or your MINI dealer before undertaking it. Always follow standard safety guidelines for car repair in performing DIY projects.


MINIs sold in North America are not equipped with the toggle switch or software to operate the rear fog lights available in other markets. The quest by some to get these to work has given rise to the jlivingood petition requesting MINI USA to address the needs of owners who want the rear fog light feature available on their MINI.

BruceK discovered that the unused fog lamp bulbs had the same 21 watt brightness as the brake lights and decided to wire them up as supplemental brake lights. While disassembling the taillight assembly to use Bruce's soldering approach, others, like gabe, realized that you could simply put a jumper between the #1 and #4 wires at the connector and accomplish the same purpose. While struggling to get the taillight assembly out, some, like Tom F., found that it was very easy to simply detach the connector, insert the jumper, and reconnect, thus leaving the tailight bulb assembly in place.

The approaches used by Bruce and Tom are outlined below, while that used by Gabe is documented here. [click for free download of Adobe Acrobat Reader required to read pdf files]


The Soldering Approach

Wiring the rear fog lamps as supplemental brake lights was easy to do. I didn't want to slice into the wiring leading to the taillight assembly in case I later wanted to try to hook up rear fog lamps. So, since the MINI's bulb holders are cleverly designed as a big, crude circuit board, I took a lesson from mistakes-in-circuit-board-design and soldered an equally crude jumper out of wire to the bulb holder. Now when the brake light circuit is switched on, power also flows to the previously unused rear fog lamp bulbs at the top of the assembly.

Here's the steps I took for each taillight:
  1. Remove the rear side access cover.
  2. Remove the taillight assembly.
  3. Disconnect the wiring loom from the back of the bulb holder assembly.
  4. Solder a wire jumper (as represented by the red line in the picture below) to the bulb holder assembly:


  5. Reconnect the wiring loom to the back of the bulb holder assembly.
  6. Test the brake lights to ensure both work.
  7. Reinstall the taillight assembly.
  8. Reattach the rear side access cover.


The Cross-Connecting Approach

Here is what you need:
  • Flashlight
  • Needlenose pliers with cutter, or equivalent
  • Jumper: a paperclip or some insulated 14 gauge single strand wire.
If you go the paperclip route, get a largish one or two, something that is about 16-14 gauge wire. A paperclip less than an inch long is probably too small. If the wire is too fine, it won't be nice and snug when you "push to fit" into the connector. Also, look for paperclips already covered with a plastic coating, and thus insulated. If not coated, you will want a couple of inches of electrical tape.

I used single strand insulated 14 gauge wire. Single strand is much more rigid than multistrand, and so it will bend and maintain a shape. A 4" length is plenty.



Instructions:
  1. Decide what kind of jumper you want, and get it.
  2. Take off the two rear side covers in the boot.
  3. Look inside and locate the connector with all the wires hanging off the middle of the taillight assembly.
  4. Disconnect the connector - there is a tab you need to push with your fingers as you pull it out.
  5. Locate the #1 and #4 connections on the connector. They are clearly numbered.
  6. Depending on your choice of jumper:

    Paperclip:

    Take a paperclip and bend into the shape of a staple, so the two legs fit into the #1 and #4 connections right next to the wires. Trial fit and trim the legs down so the top part of the "staple" is pretty flush with the plastic connector. When you have the fit right, strip 1/4" of plastic off the two ends if your paperclip is plastic coated, or if its not coated, use electrical tape to insulate the top part of the staple. Push the insulated jumper back into the #1 and #4 slots, you will feel that its nice and snug when properly installed.

    Insulated 14 guage solid wire:

    Cut your 4" piece in half, and strip about 1/4' of insulation from one end of each piece. Push that end into the #1 connector, trial fit, bend, and trim the wire to cross over and down into the #4 connector, and then cut 1/4" insulation from the other end and insert it into #4. You would like to end up with the top part of the "staple" shape is pretty flush with the plastic connector.

    Note:

    Another alternative is to use finer wire and actually crimp the jumper in with the #1 and #4 wires. Its very clean, but you have to actually open the connector and reuse the existing crimps, and there is a bit of risk of a tab breaking off. If you'd like to learn about this method, read the Oct 28, 2002 post by sirron in the MINI Cooper Online Rear lights thread.
  7. Repeat steps 3 - 6 on the other side.
  8. Reattach the connectors.
  9. Turn on the ignition and have someone stand on the brake pedal to test your work.
  10. Button up the side covers.
Congrats! You've just substantially improved the visibility of your Mini for about 5 cents worth of materials and a few minutes of your time.


Contributors:
  • gabe for starting me down this path
  • bbmykal for the picture


Contact DIY Author


How to replace exterior mirror covers
DISCLAIMER:

The information below is based on the account of a MINI2 member. Although MINI2 and the author of this thread believe this information is accurate, using it as a DIY guide is done at your own risk. MINI2 and the author are not responsible for any damage, personal injury, or warranty issues that may arise from the use of this information. Some information below may be specific to model specifications that are unique to certain countries, and may not apply to your model of MINI One, Cooper, or Cooper S.

Do not undertake any DIY project that you are not qualified to perform. If you have questions about this project, you should consult with experienced professionals and/or your MINI dealer before undertaking it. Always follow standard safety guidelines for car repair in performing DIY projects.


This guide is for those of you who want to change your mirror covers, either because you've damaged them, or you wish to change colour of them, without removing the mirror glass.

It's a simple job when you know how and should take you about 10 minutes to do both sides.

You only need one tool and that's a long thin screwdriver, or something similar, to move the clips which retain the cover.

Monsta used a long dessert spoon, like you get in restaurants for tall ice creams. Doesn't matter what you use, as long as it's long enough to reach the clips and thin enough to slip behind the mirror.

Below is a picture of my damaged mirror cover after a slight accident reversing the car when it was brand new and some other damage caused by a car bashing into it in a car park.
When you get your cover you'll notice five clips on the back. These are the clips which need to be unclipped to remove the cover (arrowed in picture).
The first thing you need to do, is switch on your ignition and lower the mirror as far as it will go.

If you now look through the gap, you should be able to see the clips inside. Easy if you have white mirror covers, harder if they're black.

Starting with the clip nearest the window, slide your screwdriver, spoon etc through the gap and under the clip. Then lever the clip up and the first part of your cover should come away. With your other hand, lift this part of the cover up so it doesn't spring down again. Continue holding the cover and lift up the middle clip. Slide your hand further under the cover to prevent both clips from springing back down.

Now do the same for the third clip along, making sure you have a tight grip on the cover. As I lifted this up it fell on the floor.
You are now left with a very bare looking mirror. Might be worth giving the back a quick clean up, to remove any water and dirt, which may have found its way in there.
To fit the new cover. Slide it on, bottom first, engaging the two clips, then roll cover up to engage the top three clips.

Et voila...
Repeat the above to change the other side, remembering to hold the cover tightly at the third clip, if you wish to retain your old covers scratch free!


Contact DIY Author

How to remove and replace the rear bumper on an 'S'
DISCLAIMER:

The information below is based on the account of a MINI2 member. Although MINI2 and the author of this thread believe this information is accurate, using it as a DIY guide is done at your own risk. MINI2 and the author are not responsible for any damage, personal injury, or warranty issues that may arise from the use of this information. Some information below may be specific to model specifications that are unique to certain countries, and may not apply to your model of MINI One, Cooper, or Cooper S.

Do not undertake any DIY project that you are not qualified to perform. If you have questions about this project, you should consult with experienced professionals and/or your MINI dealer before undertaking it. Always follow standard safety guidelines for car repair in performing DIY projects.


This process is fairly simple and does not require any special tools.

Estimated completion time is about 1 hour if you take your time.

The tools you will need are:
  • #2 Phillips Screwdriver
  • 8mm Socket
  • 10mm wrench
  • Jack & Jack Stands
  • 17mm Socket
  • Torque Wrench
  • Safety Goggles
Step 1: Take off rear wheels

First, put on the safety goggles. And now for some over-simplified instructions to get the rear of the car in the air. Keep the car from rolling by securing the front wheels. While the car is on the ground, loosen the lug bolts with the 17mm socket. Jack up the car and secure with jack stands. Remove lug bolts and remove rear wheels.

Step 2: Removing the bumper

The MINI Cooper S stock bumper is assembled to the car with nine fasteners. Seven are very easy to access. In the picture below, the fasteners have been labeled for the types. The fastener count is A=1, B=4, C=4, D=4.
< Picture 1 Fasteners
In the next three pictures, the fastener locations are labeled.
< Picture 2 Rear Bumper Off
< Picture 3 Fastener C Under Rear Fender Flair
< Picture 4 Rear Bumper
Using the 8mm socket, remove fastener A.

Next, with the Phillips Screwdriver, remove fasteners B in four locations, two on each side. These are accessed from inside the rear fender well as shown in Picture 5. Repeat on the other side of the car. Fastener B is a two-piece design. Do not be surprised if one part remains in the fender well. You will need to remove this piece before re-installation.
< Picture 5 Inside Rear Fender Well
Next, you need to remove the two screws that are hidden. The location of these two, one on each side, is under the rear fender flair that is attached to the body, as shown in Picture 3. To access these, pull outward on the flair with enough force to disengage the two rearward fasteners. The rear-most black fastener is easier than the second white fastener. With these two disengaged, you now have enough room to access Fastener C. Use your Phillips Screwdriver to remove. Repeat on the other side of the car.

The final two screws are the ones you see every time you open your boot. Locate the two fasteners C in Picture 2. Remove these two with your Phillips Screwdriver.

Your bumper is now basically free. You now need a box or something of appropriate height to support the bumper once you complete the next step because it will still be attached by the side marker light wiring and the backup light cable.

You will need to pry the rear fender wells from the rear fender flair that is attached to the bumper. This is very easily done. You bumper is now free in your hands and is only connected to the car with the two side marker lights and the backup light cables. This is where the box is handy. Support the bumper with the box (use a cloth between the bumper and box to help eliminate any scratches).

The side marker bulb holders just pull straight out with minimal force. The backup light will need a flat screwdriver or something of the like to free the catch on the connector at the light housing.
< Picture 6 Backup (Reverse) Light
Congratulations, your bumper should be totally free from the car now.

Step 3: Remove the lights

The Backup Light is snapped in to the rear bumper. To remove the light from the bumper, you simply press in the two snaps on the light and then push the light out through the outside surface of the bumper. The snaps are fairly tight and might have to do one side at a time.

Next, you need to remove the side marker lights. Each side is assembled with two Fastener Ds. Use your 10mm wrench to remove the two fastener nuts. Repeat on the other side of the bumper.
< Picture 7 Side Marker
Step 4: Reassembling the bumper

This is really just the reverse of the above directions with these helpful hints.

When tightening Fasteners D on the side marker lights, do NOT over-tighten. Snug is good enough. The plastic posts on the marker light will break. It is the old standard British car rule, when you over-tightened the nut to stripping point, the most expensive thing will be the part to break.

Do not forget to insert the maker bulb holders and the backup light in to the bumper. Attach the backup light wiring harness.

When hanging the bumper on the car, there are three major height locators for the bumper. These are shown in Pictures 8 & 9.
< Picture 8 Side Alignment Feature (Passenger Side)
< Picture 9 Center Alignment Feature
The bumper rests on the Center Alignment feature F and fits between the body and Side Alignment feature G.

Next, screw in the two screws, Fastener C, inside the boot. Only tighten about two-thirds of the way, this will allow some slight adjustment.

Maneuver the inner fender wells inside the rear bumper. Assemble Fastener B in four places by inserting the spreading part of Fastener B first into the inner fender well and bumper. Next, by either pushing or screwing, tighten the other part of the Fastener B.

Tighten Fastener C inside the rear body fender flair. Snap this fender flair back in place.

Finish tightening the two Fastener Cs inside the boot.

Tighten Fastener A.

You are now finished with the bumper.

Time to reassemble the wheels.

Dont forget to torque your lug bolts to the specification in your manual once you have the car on the ground.


Contact DIY Author

» Recent Threads
Missing Functions
Today 12:57 AM
Last post by SteveB00
Today 04:49 AM
3 Replies, 97 Views
Xenon lights problem
Dec 16th, 2014 07:49 PM
Last post by Leonidas
Yesterday 10:16 PM
2 Replies, 284 Views
New MINI Cooper S Owners Roll Call.....
Nov 18th, 2006 10:20 PM
by Paul
Last post by RckStrGrl21
Yesterday 09:59 PM
696 Replies, 170,752 Views
Does Increasing Horse Power On A Diesel 2.0 146Hp Dicrease Consumption?
Dec 16th, 2014 12:30 PM
by Bubu91
Last post by dirocyn
Yesterday 09:43 PM
6 Replies, 357 Views
Distinct Thud under floor...
Dec 14th, 2014 07:33 AM
by stirlo
Last post by stirlo
Yesterday 09:15 PM
3 Replies, 268 Views
Very Bad Rattle metal sound...
Yesterday 12:50 PM
by stirlo
Last post by stirlo
Yesterday 09:12 PM
2 Replies, 140 Views
Show me your R56 MCS and your old R53 MCS
Jul 20th, 2008 12:07 AM
by TDLC
Last post by LukaszKohut
Yesterday 08:48 PM
18 Replies, 6,887 Views
Finding Final Stage (Hedgehog) Resistor
Jul 29th, 2014 09:48 PM
Last post by crackernibbles
Yesterday 06:52 PM
18 Replies, 1,934 Views
This don't look right to me.
Dec 6th, 2014 03:04 AM
by Avro
Last post by Angib
Yesterday 06:02 PM
10 Replies, 739 Views
Clutch Slipping
Dec 14th, 2014 04:48 PM
Last post by tominator1982
Yesterday 04:50 PM
2 Replies, 206 Views
Reassemble glove box lock
Yesterday 10:02 AM
by jpadie
Last post by jpadie
Yesterday 04:41 PM
2 Replies, 168 Views
Mini One R56 2007 idling problem when engine is warm
Dec 16th, 2014 12:10 PM
by ryonski
Last post by ryonski
Yesterday 02:09 PM
4 Replies, 354 Views
2002 Cooper S R53 Fan relay resistor dorman 902-706?
May 4th, 2013 03:21 PM
Last post by Toymaker23
Yesterday 12:18 PM
2 Replies, 1,878 Views
engine will not start properly
Aug 12th, 2014 03:37 PM
by genik
Last post by MKuRNDY
Yesterday 02:44 AM
4 Replies, 869 Views
New Owner with a Question.
Yesterday 01:44 AM
Last post by Steve Ball
Yesterday 01:44 AM
0 Replies, 180 Views
Heater not working
Dec 15th, 2014 08:03 AM
Last post by mab01uk
Dec 17th, 2014 11:49 PM
4 Replies, 399 Views
Review - AEM Cold Air Intake
Nov 27th, 2014 10:13 AM
Last post by deej_bb
Dec 17th, 2014 11:02 PM
1 Replies, 385 Views
AGM Battery
Mar 28th, 2013 11:06 AM
Last post by SteveM3
Dec 17th, 2014 11:01 PM
10 Replies, 5,831 Views
Dash and Door Trim Replacement
Dec 15th, 2014 03:52 AM
Last post by SteveM3
Dec 17th, 2014 10:42 PM
1 Replies, 248 Views
Engine Oil consumption boy is the Cooper that thirsty?
Dec 15th, 2014 06:23 PM
by Sian1
Last post by deej_bb
Dec 17th, 2014 10:41 PM
3 Replies, 304 Views
» Premium
» Auto Insurance
Wheel & Tire Center

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.1

All times are GMT. The time now is 07:58 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2