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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old Oct 28th, 2018, 11:38 AM Thread Starter
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Mini Cooper R56 Error code p0036 still

So recently i did a head gasket change and series of other work on my 08 mini cooper. After re-assembling i started to get error code p0036, heater bank 1 sensor 2 error. It wasn't always on, i could go a week without getting it, sometimes 5 minutes. Logically i replaced the post cat O2 sensor as this was the one throwing the code but within an hour or so of driving i got the same error code. I assumed it may be fuse related but i checked the fuse and there's no visible issues. I didn't replace the pre-cat sensor as it had been done less than 20k ago and it wasn't getting any errors relating to it. The only other thing i can think is its a grounding issue but i don't exactly know where its grounding at. Im going to try and find the ground and clean it off and see if its an issue there but i doubt it. In the mean time if anyone else has experienced anything similar or has any other suggestions it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!


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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old Oct 28th, 2018, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by jnhenderson View Post
So recently i did a head gasket change and series of other work on my 08 mini cooper. After re-assembling i started to get error code p0036, heater bank 1 sensor 2 error. It wasn't always on, i could go a week without getting it, sometimes 5 minutes. Logically i replaced the post cat O2 sensor as this was the one throwing the code but within an hour or so of driving i got the same error code. I assumed it may be fuse related but i checked the fuse and there's no visible issues. I didn't replace the pre-cat sensor as it had been done less than 20k ago and it wasn't getting any errors relating to it. The only other thing i can think is its a grounding issue but i don't exactly know where its grounding at. Im going to try and find the ground and clean it off and see if its an issue there but i doubt it. In the mean time if anyone else has experienced anything similar or has any other suggestions it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Error Code P0036 is defined as a trouble code for Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2s) Control Circuit, Bank 1, Sensor 2. This can mean that the specified sensor is not sending the right data to the PCM (powertrain control module).

Note that it’s actually a generic definition of the error code. Your vehicle manufacturer may have a different specific and information of the code. GM for example, defines it as ‘Heater Control Circuit Conditions.’

DEFINITION
Error Code P0036 means there’s an ongoing problem on the heater element of the HO2S. The job of the control module is to oversee how much time it takes for the sensor to warm up and start sending ample signal. This code is triggered when the sensor is taking too long to warm up.

For the engine to run efficiently, its exhaust should have a specified ratio of air and fuel (14.7:1, respectively) as determined by the HO2S, which works by detecting the oxygen from the exhaust. The data is calculated by the PCM and it adjusts the amount of fuel delivered to the engine automatically. The HO2S is heated to ensure the PCM maintains a high speed response closed loop system, which reduces emissions at startup, and when the engine is still warming up.

This code shows up when the PCM detects that there’s an open or shorted to ground HO2S circuit.

COMMON SYMPTOMS
Aside from the Check Engine light being activated, symptoms of this error code include symptoms associated with heated circuit failure, as it runs briefly when the vehicle first starts. The same sensor is also after the catalytic converter, thus, will not affect the air/fuel ratio input the PCM receives; it’s usually used to verify the efficiency of the catalytic converter. Other symptoms include:

PCM going failsafe mode which results to drivability problems (depending on the PCM programming of the manufacturer)
Vehicle failing on emission test
POSSIBLE CAUSES
There can be many causes for this error code. For one, water that enters the HO2S can cause its fuse to blow. Also, the sensor may be defective, or there is defective wiring, keeping the sensor from sending the required data to the PCM. Other possible causes include:

Open power, ground wires or open circuit inside the O2 sensor
Broken or corroded exhaust system ground strap
Failure in the wiring of PCM (or ECM) or O2 sensor heater circuit
HOW TO CHECK
As with many error codes, Error Code P0036 requires thorough visual checking for loose or damaged wiring to the sensor.

This error code can only be triggered either by the oxygen sensor heater circuit or by the sensor itself. For its diagnosis, it usually starts with the checking of the wiring system of the sensor. Usually, the heated oxygen sensor comes with four wires. Two of the wires head straight to the heater circuit, while the other two are for power and ground of the sensor. This diagnosis is about checking the wires for the heater circuit. You may need a wiring diagram of your vehicle to be sure you’re testing the right set of wires.

Testing the Heater Circuit Wiring
Test the heater circuit wiring using digital multimeter or DVOM (digital volt ohm meter). Again, consult with the vehicle’s wiring diagram for the exact pins of the connector where the ground is set. The other end should touch the power feed, while the other touching the black multimeter lead. The reading must be close to the battery’s voltage. If not, then there’s a good chance your oxygen sensor power supply is the cause of the problem. If so, then you may have to check the power of the vehicle. Check the circuit fault lies from the wiring diagram.

Connect the battery’s positive terminal to the red multimeter lead, and the black lead to the ground to check for the circuit’s ground. The result must be 12V. If not, then you need to refer to the ground side of the wiring diagram.

Testing the Sensor Heating Element
If both power and ground are good, then your next option is to check the sensor heating element to determine whether it’s an open circuit or high resistance. Again, you will need a digital multimeter.

Using the DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) set at Ohm scale, test the heater circuit’s resistance using a wiring diagram as reference. Make sure you unplug the oxygen sensor. The heater circuit inside the sensor must have resistance present. Over limit reading indicates open in the circuit’s heated portion, which indicates replacement for the oxygen sensor.

If the reading says OL, that means there’s an open circuit in the heating element. Again, you need to replace the sensor.

HOW TO FIX
Back-probe the connector’s ground wire and inspect for resistance between the connector to the O2 sensor and the resistance of a good ground.

Then, back probe the wire of the power supply using the DVOM set to DC volts with the negative lead to a good-known ground and the positive to the wire of the power supply to check for supply of the O2 sensor. If you haven’t seen power at the connector during cold start (car startup), then there’s a high chance there’s a problem with the vehicle’s power supply circuit straight to the oxygen circuit of the PCM itself.

Error Code P0036 can be triggered by many different things, but it’s usually damage on the wiring caused by excessive heat that triggers it. Make sure the wiring of the sensor is in good condition, has proper voltage and good ground before replacing the sensor.

below is autocom screen shots of a 1.4 prince engine running correctly with 02 sensors listed

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Albert Einstein: The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 3rd, 2018, 02:07 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mike1967 View Post
Error Code P0036 is defined as a trouble code for Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2s) Control Circuit, Bank 1, Sensor 2. This can mean that the specified sensor is not sending the right data to the PCM (powertrain control module).

Note that it’s actually a generic definition of the error code. Your vehicle manufacturer may have a different specific and information of the code. GM for example, defines it as ‘Heater Control Circuit Conditions.’

DEFINITION
Error Code P0036 means there’s an ongoing problem on the heater element of the HO2S. The job of the control module is to oversee how much time it takes for the sensor to warm up and start sending ample signal. This code is triggered when the sensor is taking too long to warm up.

For the engine to run efficiently, its exhaust should have a specified ratio of air and fuel (14.7:1, respectively) as determined by the HO2S, which works by detecting the oxygen from the exhaust. The data is calculated by the PCM and it adjusts the amount of fuel delivered to the engine automatically. The HO2S is heated to ensure the PCM maintains a high speed response closed loop system, which reduces emissions at startup, and when the engine is still warming up.

This code shows up when the PCM detects that there’s an open or shorted to ground HO2S circuit.

COMMON SYMPTOMS
Aside from the Check Engine light being activated, symptoms of this error code include symptoms associated with heated circuit failure, as it runs briefly when the vehicle first starts. The same sensor is also after the catalytic converter, thus, will not affect the air/fuel ratio input the PCM receives; it’s usually used to verify the efficiency of the catalytic converter. Other symptoms include:

PCM going failsafe mode which results to drivability problems (depending on the PCM programming of the manufacturer)
Vehicle failing on emission test
POSSIBLE CAUSES
There can be many causes for this error code. For one, water that enters the HO2S can cause its fuse to blow. Also, the sensor may be defective, or there is defective wiring, keeping the sensor from sending the required data to the PCM. Other possible causes include:

Open power, ground wires or open circuit inside the O2 sensor
Broken or corroded exhaust system ground strap
Failure in the wiring of PCM (or ECM) or O2 sensor heater circuit
HOW TO CHECK
As with many error codes, Error Code P0036 requires thorough visual checking for loose or damaged wiring to the sensor.

This error code can only be triggered either by the oxygen sensor heater circuit or by the sensor itself. For its diagnosis, it usually starts with the checking of the wiring system of the sensor. Usually, the heated oxygen sensor comes with four wires. Two of the wires head straight to the heater circuit, while the other two are for power and ground of the sensor. This diagnosis is about checking the wires for the heater circuit. You may need a wiring diagram of your vehicle to be sure you’re testing the right set of wires.

Testing the Heater Circuit Wiring
Test the heater circuit wiring using digital multimeter or DVOM (digital volt ohm meter). Again, consult with the vehicle’s wiring diagram for the exact pins of the connector where the ground is set. The other end should touch the power feed, while the other touching the black multimeter lead. The reading must be close to the battery’s voltage. If not, then there’s a good chance your oxygen sensor power supply is the cause of the problem. If so, then you may have to check the power of the vehicle. Check the circuit fault lies from the wiring diagram.

Connect the battery’s positive terminal to the red multimeter lead, and the black lead to the ground to check for the circuit’s ground. The result must be 12V. If not, then you need to refer to the ground side of the wiring diagram.

Testing the Sensor Heating Element
If both power and ground are good, then your next option is to check the sensor heating element to determine whether it’s an open circuit or high resistance. Again, you will need a digital multimeter.

Using the DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) set at Ohm scale, test the heater circuit’s resistance using a wiring diagram as reference. Make sure you unplug the oxygen sensor. The heater circuit inside the sensor must have resistance present. Over limit reading indicates open in the circuit’s heated portion, which indicates replacement for the oxygen sensor.

If the reading says OL, that means there’s an open circuit in the heating element. Again, you need to replace the sensor.

HOW TO FIX
Back-probe the connector’s ground wire and inspect for resistance between the connector to the O2 sensor and the resistance of a good ground.

Then, back probe the wire of the power supply using the DVOM set to DC volts with the negative lead to a good-known ground and the positive to the wire of the power supply to check for supply of the O2 sensor. If you haven’t seen power at the connector during cold start (car startup), then there’s a high chance there’s a problem with the vehicle’s power supply circuit straight to the oxygen circuit of the PCM itself.

Error Code P0036 can be triggered by many different things, but it’s usually damage on the wiring caused by excessive heat that triggers it. Make sure the wiring of the sensor is in good condition, has proper voltage and good ground before replacing the sensor.

below is autocom screen shots of a 1.4 prince engine running correctly with 02 sensors listed
Hey Mike,

Its been a while since i last posted and i have undertaken so many diagnostic tests. I would take it to a garage but im almost determined at this point to find out the issue by myself. So following your last post i grabbed my multimeter and started probing. So the power to the heater circuit side of the sensor is where i have my first question, the connector on the wiring harness has four coloured wires; black, yellow, orange and white. Black and yellow are the ground and signal wire leaving orange and white to be the heater wires, now am i right in thinking that one is the power supply and one is the ground for the heater or are they both supply and they use the other grounded wire. The reason i wonder this is, if i back probe the orange wire with battery ground i get 12.2v which is the correct voltage however if i probe the white wire with battery ground i get -0.4v or so but if i probe it with the battery positive i get around 8v. Is this supposed happen? if it is a ground it should have no value at all and if its a supply it should be 12v?

Anyways i ran into this issue so i decided to take it for a diagnostics at the garage i normally go to. During this time the mechanic found that the post cat O2 sensor or O2B1S2 was pinning its voltage at 1.2v and not moving at all not matter how much the engine heated. Obviously this value is meant to change as the temperature fluctuates, also from what i have read it shouldnt really be above 1v anyways as it normally outputs a value of around 0.5v. So he mentioned it was either a sensor fault or it was getting the supply of 1.2v from somewhere else in the engine due to a short. So i returned home and tested for continuity and resistance between the sensor connector and the ECU plugs (by this i mean the big lever action plugs that connect all the sensors into the ECU, there are 3 of them). Continuity was fine and there was no indication of a short circuit in the resistance testing either. I know there are two type of short circuit one being to ground and the other being a supply feed short from another wire but im not sure how to test for the supply feed. I did visually inspect the cables to the best of my ability but couldnt see any damage or non-insulated cables.

I thought i would try and grab some pictures from my OBD scanner to show the voltage being pinned at 1.2v for sensor 2 but when i plugged my scanner in i was instead getting the voltage frozen at 0.455V and when i checked with my multimeter i was getting that value on the wiring harness sensor connector when the sensor wasnt plugged in. Is this just a value the ECU is defaulting too so the engine can run whilest the O2 sensor is faulty and my OBD scanner is just too cheap to read past the value the ECU is telling itself? I know this was frozen because like the mechanic found with the 1.2v the value did not change for 0.455V no matter how long i ran or revved the engine.

Ultimately if you have any idea what any of this means and could shed some light i would be greatful. The O2 sensor i bought was an off brand one on eBay that the seller has since taken down the listing but i dont know if this is because the sensor had an issue or he simply ran out of stock. To double check i have ordered a more expensive HAAS sensor from my autoparts store but obviously if it isnt the sensor and is some sort of wiring issue then ill need to approach it differently i just wanted to completely rule out a faulty sensor.

Thanks again for any help im not the greatest at explaining things so if any of this doesnt make sense or you need more info please let me know. Ill include some of the pictures of the OBD reader too. I noticed with the OBD reader it couldnt check the voltage of sensor 1 for some bizarre reason, i dont know if this is once again just because its a cheap OBD reader but it did manage to get the voltage of sensor 2


This is with the engine completely off just ignition on


This was after 5 minutes of run time revving etc. no change throughout

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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 3rd, 2018, 03:07 PM
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pic of generic wiring for post cat sensor, i have seen many very cheap sensors that last two minutes sold on ebay sometimes its just go buy it from europarts on a discount code and know it should be ok i would feel. you need to start off knowing the component your scanner is telling you is faulty if faulty, fact it dont change volts when car is running tells me its not happy.. try this test again car needs to be at running temperature live data watch the sensor readings and then for 2 minutes rev car at 3000 revs see what voltage changes you get, on difference from idle to revs 3k can fluctuate this every 30 seconds while doing this the prepost sensor should be 1-3 volts changing changing a lot faster than the post sensor,,
i have been where you are with one of these because i wrongly thought a new sensor would be a good sensor so ruled it out and should of trusted my diagnostic machine telling me its faulty or working but poorly,, ie calibrated wrongly to the exhaust gasses so producing wrong resistances with in it , that only a scope and a car the same next to it or guarded info garages dont share with anyone it would seem.
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 3rd, 2018, 03:11 PM
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below link diagnostics will give you better access on live data, you will thank me for buying one . will show deep fault codes p-codes dealer only these would be hidden with what your using
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2017-Blue...d2O:rk:11:pf:0
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 3rd, 2018, 03:35 PM Thread Starter
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pic of generic wiring for post cat sensor, i have seen many very cheap sensors that last two minutes sold on ebay sometimes its just go buy it from europarts on a discount code and know it should be ok i would feel. you need to start off knowing the component your scanner is telling you is faulty if faulty, fact it dont change volts when car is running tells me its not happy.. try this test again car needs to be at running temperature live data watch the sensor readings and then for 2 minutes rev car at 3000 revs see what voltage changes you get, on difference from idle to revs 3k can fluctuate this every 30 seconds while doing this the prepost sensor should be 1-3 volts changing changing a lot faster than the post sensor,,
i have been where you are with one of these because i wrongly thought a new sensor would be a good sensor so ruled it out and should of trusted my diagnostic machine telling me its faulty or working but poorly,, ie calibrated wrongly to the exhaust gasses so producing wrong resistances with in it , that only a scope and a car the same next to it or guarded info garages dont share with anyone it would seem.
Quick update, i did exactly what you mentioned and ordered a sensor from eurocarparts just to make sure it wasnt the cheap ebay one. Sadly no changes, still sitting at 0.455V and throwing error code P0036. Also i checked out the ebay link you said but sadly my car has its MOT due on the 20th of this month and that OBD reader wont be here before that. Might have to bite the bullet and get the Amazon prime one for double the price. Failing that i may just take it to an auto electronics place near my house because im quickly running out of options.

forgot to mention im also getting this fault on the obd reader i assume its because the O2 sensor isnt working properly


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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 3rd, 2018, 03:48 PM
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Quick update, i did exactly what you mentioned and ordered a sensor from eurocarparts just to make sure it wasnt the cheap ebay one. Sadly no changes, still sitting at 0.455V and throwing error code P0036. Also i checked out the ebay link you said but sadly my car has its MOT due on the 20th of this month and that OBD reader wont be here before that. Might have to bite the bullet and get the Amazon prime one for double the price. Failing that i may just take it to an auto electronics place near my house because im quickly running out of options.

forgot to mention im also getting this fault on the obd reader i assume its because the O2 sensor isnt working properly

after changing sensors and still same issue its on a bigger level or whether its ecu related or its how car is running and the sensors are doing their job and reading a engine thats ill from something else.. hence why i bang on to people that having a known cheap diagnostics that will deffo read and work with all controllers and fault codes is a must have thing to even stand a chance to work out whats going on with it, i should have shares in that autocom for the amount of times i tell people about it,,, its really that good and no other for the cost comes close to it.
see i your car is running weak mixture ie air leak some where it will show up at your sensors, or if injectors are faulty over fuelling and runs rich the sensors will record this and run so low trying to trim the mixtures, even a stretch timing chain or out of time engine will also effect it big time, dirty air cleaner same thing, all throw these sensors out of where they should work, ie low voltages or high voltages back to ecu signal depending on weak or rich,, lamda sensors do just that sense whats being thrown out of engine, even oil burning engine will effect what they sense, this all said without diagnostics that allow full coverage and a lot of digging to find real problem,,,
worth back to basics see i there is something causing it like above check it rule it out,
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 4th, 2018, 01:42 PM Thread Starter
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after changing sensors and still same issue its on a bigger level or whether its ecu related or its how car is running and the sensors are doing their job and reading a engine thats ill from something else.. hence why i bang on to people that having a known cheap diagnostics that will deffo read and work with all controllers and fault codes is a must have thing to even stand a chance to work out whats going on with it, i should have shares in that autocom for the amount of times i tell people about it,,, its really that good and no other for the cost comes close to it.
see i your car is running weak mixture ie air leak some where it will show up at your sensors, or if injectors are faulty over fuelling and runs rich the sensors will record this and run so low trying to trim the mixtures, even a stretch timing chain or out of time engine will also effect it big time, dirty air cleaner same thing, all throw these sensors out of where they should work, ie low voltages or high voltages back to ecu signal depending on weak or rich,, lamda sensors do just that sense whats being thrown out of engine, even oil burning engine will effect what they sense, this all said without diagnostics that allow full coverage and a lot of digging to find real problem,,,
worth back to basics see i there is something causing it like above check it rule it out,
I think im finally at the point where this problem is solved, had the car into a local diagnostic centre this morning and the guy who runs it is mad on minis so he found the issue within a few seconds but i think if any mechanic had a look they would have came across this too. Basically the colour of the connector that is attached to the wiring harness of the car matters apparently and now it has been pointed out it makes perfect sense but ive never came across it before so i didnt even think it would be an issue. Basically the cheap sensor i bought had a white connector, the HAAS branded sensor had a pale green connector and the one i needed was a dark blue. Apparently the colour of plugs reflects different resistance rating for the sensor or at least thats part of the colour coding. So ive ordered a NGK plug which i believe is basically OEM this does have a dark blue connector but is also triple the price . It seems that when it comes to O2 sensors you cant skimp on cheaper sensors. Oh well if anyone else runs into this issue hopefully you will find this thread! Remember the colour of the sensor and the plug need to be the same which after scouring the internet for weeks i did not see a single mention of this fact. If this doesnt fix the problem i will no doubt be back but heres to hoping.

thanks for all the help mike!

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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 4th, 2018, 01:49 PM
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I think im finally at the point where this problem is solved, had the car into a local diagnostic centre this morning and the guy who runs it is mad on minis so he found the issue within a few seconds but i think if any mechanic had a look they would have came across this too. Basically the colour of the connector that is attached to the wiring harness of the car matters apparently and now it has been pointed out it makes perfect sense but ive never came across it before so i didnt even think it would be an issue. Basically the cheap sensor i bought had a white connector, the HAAS branded sensor had a pale green connector and the one i needed was a dark blue. Apparently the colour of plugs reflects different resistance rating for the sensor or at least thats part of the colour coding. So ive ordered a NGK plug which i believe is basically OEM this does have a dark blue connector but is also triple the price . It seems that when it comes to O2 sensors you cant skimp on cheaper sensors. Oh well if anyone else runs into this issue hopefully you will find this thread! Remember the colour of the sensor and the plug need to be the same which after scouring the internet for weeks i did not see a single mention of this fact. If this doesnt fix the problem i will no doubt be back but heres to hoping.

thanks for all the help mike!
yep blue plug on downstream sensor and yes not all sensors are the same, the upstream is a 5 wire black plug, always a gamble using non genuine branded
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 5th, 2018, 06:46 PM Thread Starter
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yep blue plug on downstream sensor and yes not all sensors are the same, the upstream is a 5 wire black plug, always a gamble using non genuine branded
Really didnt want to be back again but here we are. Car ran fine for a day, no issues what so ever but then tonight just went to start it and got management light. Firstly it threw codes P0139, P0136 and P0036 all of them relate to the sensor. Checked what they meant, they mean a few different things but all the advice was to clear the codes and see if they come back. The only code i can get now is P0036 the orginal heater circuit code. Checked the sensor for resistance and no OL readings it was at about 9/10 ohms which is right. Unlike previously the voltage value is changing on my OBD scanner even with the code present and its changing depending on temps etc. so the sensor is clearly still working to some degree. Is it possible ive just had the worst luck and the sensor i have bought is in fact faulty? or is this clearly another issue. I checked voltages for the heaters circuit and its still getting over 12V from the battery. Im just so confused


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post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 6th, 2018, 06:31 AM
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Really didnt want to be back again but here we are. Car ran fine for a day, no issues what so ever but then tonight just went to start it and got management light. Firstly it threw codes P0139, P0136 and P0036 all of them relate to the sensor. Checked what they meant, they mean a few different things but all the advice was to clear the codes and see if they come back. The only code i can get now is P0036 the orginal heater circuit code. Checked the sensor for resistance and no OL readings it was at about 9/10 ohms which is right. Unlike previously the voltage value is changing on my OBD scanner even with the code present and its changing depending on temps etc. so the sensor is clearly still working to some degree. Is it possible ive just had the worst luck and the sensor i have bought is in fact faulty? or is this clearly another issue. I checked voltages for the heaters circuit and its still getting over 12V from the battery. Im just so confused
what ever it is its intermittent ,,,, engine harness maybe, or ecu related maybe . i know this is a vague answer but you have done all that i would of done. one of those faults,
new 02 sensors always play up for a few days after replacing them 2 or 3 cold to hot to cold starts and a stops when the adaptations are not reset in the ecu, takes a few of these to re learn where to play nice with ecu as such, i have had a few brand new 02 sensors fail the first time few times they get really hot, and its important to get them really hot as heat is how they work better.
only thing i could suggest is find a engine harness and replace yours or strip yours back and go through the wires with a multimeter and keep moving it around see if reading jumps around.
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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 20th, 2018, 03:55 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mike1967 View Post
what ever it is its intermittent ,,,, engine harness maybe, or ecu related maybe . i know this is a vague answer but you have done all that i would of done. one of those faults,
new 02 sensors always play up for a few days after replacing them 2 or 3 cold to hot to cold starts and a stops when the adaptations are not reset in the ecu, takes a few of these to re learn where to play nice with ecu as such, i have had a few brand new 02 sensors fail the first time few times they get really hot, and its important to get them really hot as heat is how they work better.
only thing i could suggest is find a engine harness and replace yours or strip yours back and go through the wires with a multimeter and keep moving it around see if reading jumps around.
Finally got it sorted, turns out it was actually the new sensor. It just so happened that after all of the hassle i had the sensor i bought was faulty. I ended up speaking to a local mini "expert" and he advised me that he wouldnt by parts for his push bike from Eurocarparts and especially anything electrical. I personally dont share this opinion but i let him order a new sensor from his supplier and it works, been driving for about a week or so now and no sign of the issue returning. Glad to be sorted with this and thanks for all the suggestions you presented.

J Henderson
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post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old Dec 20th, 2018, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by jnhenderson View Post
Finally got it sorted, turns out it was actually the new sensor. It just so happened that after all of the hassle i had the sensor i bought was faulty. I ended up speaking to a local mini "expert" and he advised me that he wouldnt by parts for his push bike from Eurocarparts and especially anything electrical. I personally dont share this opinion but i let him order a new sensor from his supplier and it works, been driving for about a week or so now and no sign of the issue returning. Glad to be sorted with this and thanks for all the suggestions you presented.
i've lost count of the stuff i've bought from europarts and been fine, as do a lot of garages. think its a better option to buy genuine Bosch parts
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