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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
During past winter my 2008 clubman started throwing P0015 errors, sometimes with careful acceleration the error would go away only to come back again later. Once it even went into limp-home mode, but after resetting the errors via Torque and a bluetooth dongle and waiting for it to warm up after idle I was able to drive again.

Took it to local mechanic and they ended up replacing the following:
  • Vanos Solenoids
  • Vacuum pump
  • Cam sensors
  • Timing chain
  • radiator grill (unrelated, but needed doing)
On picking up the car weeks later, it stalled, but at that point It was weeks into working on it and I figured I just needed to wait for adaptations to reset. Boy was I wrong. The next day P0015 popped up again.

I got a K+Dcan cable to help with diagnostics.
I found a copy of INPA and R56(also works for my R55) Datens on the bimmergeeks site but it would not work out of the box.
Eventually I figured out how to get it to work after I noticed that the settings that get pulled for running INPALOADER.exe are not from INPA.ini but rather the E3PROTOK.ini file in the prt folder. After adjusting for R55 and pointing to a MEX17_2n that I found on the internet, I was able to load the engine scripts....in German.

Now when I start in inpa and watch the VVT, I can see some funny angles. It's hard to tell what is going on being in German, but at least I get some data.

This is what I see when I first start the car:
280846


When it starts going into rough idle I start to see the following:

280847


Is a 176 angle the angle at which the vanos is locked up? Is it likely the case that oil is not being fed to it? To that end, is there a way to monitor oil pressure with Inpa? I seem to be having an issue where I can not access all the info available with relevant buttons greyed out:

280848


Sorry for the long post. Hoping someone can point me in the right direction.

Ps: google translate was a real help in translating real-time what the German on the screen was saying from my phone.

Thank you!
 

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first off it has no mention of vanos ie this is the timing chain variable timing process ,,, VVT is variable valve timing ie high lift valve for the inlet camshaft two different things but do work together if that makes sensor,
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the quick reply!

I've actually been reading up on a lot of your posts to diagnose this issue, hence the current thinking of monitoring oil pressure sensor.

Re: angles , bah! sounds like I got a lot of learning to do. I was wondering why there was no mention of a second vanos sprocket givent that the N12 has 2. Gunna try to reinstall INPA with mini datens see if i can get the full access to variables with vanos information.

Regarding VVT, I get that the vanos sprocket positions can be sensed by the input/exhaust camshaft sensors, but what senses the variable valve timing?

Thank you!
 

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Thank you for the quick reply!

I've actually been reading up on a lot of your posts to diagnose this issue, hence the current thinking of monitoring oil pressure sensor.

Re: angles , bah! sounds like I got a lot of learning to do. I was wondering why there was no mention of a second vanos sprocket givent that the N12 has 2. Gunna try to reinstall INPA with mini datens see if i can get the full access to variables with vanos information.

Regarding VVT, I get that the vanos sprocket positions can be sensed by the input/exhaust camshaft sensors, but what senses the variable valve timing?

Thank you!
would think when finding what engine on insta you might have found the 14 engine ie its got inlet vanos only but dont have vvt so that would not make sense either, i have insta never use it, always use autocom cdp plus better system faster to use and live data is very good on it,, link below best £40 you will ever spend for a diagnostic's tool in my book.
33.23US $ 13% OFF|2021 Autocome vdIJk Autocoms pro 2017.3 keygen vd V3.0 Relay OBD2 Cars Diagnostic Interface Tool for delphis scanner Adapter|Car Diagnostic Cables & Connectors| - AliExpress
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alright, I ended up getting replacement rectanglerings for the camshaft seal, a timing toolkit, a eX socket set, a digital torque sensor and 2 replacement vanos sprocket bolts.

Since I haven't been able to find too many guides on replacing camshaft seal rings without timing chain replacement, Could someone confirm that the following approach is feasible:
1) remove air intake to access timing tensioner
2) remove valve covers
3) rotate engine by hand till camshafts point up & look for oil seeping out bearing block near vanos on exhaust camshaft
4) lock flywheel/ cams
5) remove timing guide between 2 vanos sprockets
6) remove timing tensioner from back of engine
7) remove only the exhaust vanos
8) remove the bearing block closest to vanos and loosen the exhaust camshaft
9) replace 2 seals
10) bolt everything back together in reverse order

The main points are that I don't want to remove the intake vanos and I would not want to remove the left engine bracket.

Is there enough slack in the chain to remove the exhaust vanos only assuming tensioner and guide have been removed?

Thank you!
 

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check your timing hasn't slipped first.. get hold of a decent cam locking kit - don't reply on them cheap china ebay kits, they don't work.

with the flywheel locking pin in place

pic 1. shows an cheap ebay kit - it fits comfortably over the both cams and appears to be fine.
pic 2 . shows a laser 5147 locking kit - and it clearly displays how bad the ebay kit is .

Pic 1
Light Motor vehicle Automotive fuel system Auto part Automotive super charger part


Pic 2
Motor vehicle Light Automotive design Automotive exhaust Auto part
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Alright, did the thing yesterday, here is what I can say of the process:

-It is doable without removing the timing belt thanks to the vanos unit being press fit onto the cam rather than having a long shaft.
-There is not enough slack in the chain with the guide and tensioner removed to take the chain off the sprocket, but once you unscrew the vanos, it makes the slack necessary and will come out no problem.
-I got a 35 dollar kit from eBay, and the fit was good. Same as pic 1 that lee_evo posted. Although, looking back at the order, the kit I ordered was slightly different than what I received. For reference here is what I ordered: ebay. And this is what I received:
281129


The description shows a flywheel lock pin with a 45 degree cut, but the one I got had a post welded on the back of it. Still fit great in my N12 engine without any modification.

- The original camshaft seals "rectangle rings" were of a split ring design made up of 2 types of metal:
281130
281131

-In pulling out the ring closest to the sprocket, it snapped. It was also a different structure with the darker metal on one side of the ring rather than both sides having banding as in the above side-view photo.
  • The replacement rings are some sort of polymer and go on pretty easily. I ended up boiling them, but I saw 2 bubbles and that kinda worries me that I started getting water into them. In any case, it was absolutely not necessary as you don't need to stretch them out given the contours of the camshaft. Don't try to force them on the face like I did. They go on really easy if you just place the ring from one side first. For the ring further from the camshaft end, I just placed it first into the well area between the 2 rings to get it onto the shaft, then got it into its place.
  • The digital torque sensor I got for this job was useless for what I really needed it for. It was a bit too bulky.Since I needed to avoid removing the engine mount as I had no way to prop it up without a jackstand, I had a large chunk of metal in the way where the torque sensor would have been placed. I tried to remove the headlight and use an extension bar at a slight angle to the bolt, which would have probably ruined my accuracy, but may have worked. I wasn't able to try this as one of the bolts holding on the headlight lost connection between the brass threaded insert and its plastic overmold. With one bolt free-spinning, I couldn't remove the headlight.
  • What gave me some confidence in putting a new vanos bolt back in was this thing:
281134

I ended up putting a hose clamp on my 3/8in wrench at the 6" mark to act as a pressure point, then held the scale against that point as I tightened the bolt with the scale. Since it was only 6 inch lever, the 15ft-lb's of torque requested became 30, but a bathroom scale displayed that just fine. Then a right angle ruler to guide the +180 on the bolt.


All in all, here are the steps I did the thing with:
1) Roll car up ramps to access underside in the front.
2) Put car in neutral and engage parking brake
3) Open hood :p
4) Remove air intake box, air filter box and attached hose going from maf sensor to throttle.
5) Remove all coil packs/ wiring around valve cover (no need to remove spark plugs, actually leaving them in prevents stuff from getting into combustion chambers.
6) Remove valve cover breather hose (I left the cam sensors in there, didn't bother removing)
-- Started looking for ways to get access to the timing chain guide bolt
7) Remove throttle body (no need to remove the engine mount or intake manifold, removing the throttle gives enough to access the timing tensioner bolt at the back of the engine.)
8) Put clean towel into intake (In general a good idea to keep things covered especially when working on an active street as I was) (kept a towel over the valves and only pulled it back to work on something.
9) Remove valve cover
10) Get access to crankshaft from under car and rotate it clockwise looking from passenger side. Rotate until camshaft markings appear and are both facing up.
11) Use the flywheel lockpin to pin the crankshaft by getting it just in the right spot. I had to wiggle the wrench while trying gently to put in the lockpin and it slid in smoothly once aligned.
12) Use other parts of timing kit to lock camshafts. (The tools prevent rotation of the shafts, for the case of replacing the seals, they still allow enough free-play to allow the shafts to be raised to a point where the seals can be replaced.)
13) Remove the timing chain tensioner from back of engine.
14) Remove the timing chain guide between the 2 vanos units
15) Remove the exhaust vanos
16) loosen the exhaust camshaft to the point where the seals can clear the end and be pulled off/ put on
17) replace them.
18) now do everything backwards and put stuff back together.
19) In putting the Vanos back I don't really think it matters which side or direction it points, gravity should not affect it, and with a friction fit to the camshaft, it's the timing tools locking the cam in place. Just to be safe I put the exhaust vanos dot to point up just as the intake one does.
I would love to hear if and why it does matter if that is the case, but by its design, I really don't think it does.
20) do follow Tension guides, but for the timing chain guide (between sprockets) 20N-M may be really heavy handed. It's what my Haynes manual states, but I got to 18N-M and started feeling the bolt start to give. Be CAREFUL here, you don't want loose bolts inside your valves.

Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Regarding INPA, I was finally able to get it to work on my N12 engine... The MEX17_2N.ipo is about 179kb in size and is indeed the correct script to use. When you launch it, it asks you if you have a MEV(N12) or MED(N14) engine type. Once launched, I vas able to reset the adaptation values on the vanos.

Unfortunately, now I have the p0012 error code which is intake cam advanced.... Great. Seems I didn't get the tensioning right.
 

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a couple of things you might find useful buddy

Detailed timing chain replacement guide

Engine support bracket (Remove the serpentine belt tensioner and it fits to that bracket) - really useful when the engine mount is removed
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Woa, yes, I definitly need to do a read through on that guide. Thanks a lot for that link. Luckily I bought a spare vanos bolt, just not looking forward to using a bathroom scale again. In reading it, it doesn't seem like I missed anything except pretensioning the timing chain tensioner. In my case I just installed it back in once I got the exhaust vanos loosly tightened, then went and tightened down the vanos to spec.

Here's How I setup INPA: got the bimmergeeks download of standard tools here:

I didn't find updating the datens necessary, but they do have a datens file update available. Once installed check that the c:/ec-apps/inpa/sgdat/mev17_2n.ipo file is about 179kb or 180kb in size. Btw, capitalization doesn't matter to INPA.

Once installed:
1) edit C:\EC-APPS\INPA\PRT\ENGLISCH\E3PROTOK.INI to have the following:

F2 = R56
F2_Text = R56 (R55,R56)
F2_ARCHIV = SGBD_R56

instead of whatever they had.

2) Add the following 2 lines to the [ROOT_MOTOR] section of C:\EC-APPS\INPA\CFGDAT\R56.ENG

ENTRY= MEx17_2,MEx17 for N12,
ENTRY= MEx17_2N,MEx17_2N for N12,

That's it. In my case, during my messing about I discovered that the engine dme got detected as a MEV17_2N, so in my case the MEx17_2N was the right script to use. The first thing that pops up should be a selection between the MEV and MED engines, and from there on it's all in german. I just used the google translate app on my phone and held it up to the screen to read what was being displayed.

Good luck!
 
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