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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was going to pile onto a @mike1967 thread though figured it was better to hope he drops into mine. If you do, I'll echo what another poster said about your wealth of knowledge and willingness to share. I'll be reading and rereading all his builds to hopefully sort out my very first repair of this magnitude.

On to the point of this thread, within 3 months/3k miles the engine suddenly ran awfully under light load. Prior to that, it had an odd occasional surge from stop. Nothing that would set a fault code. I knew it was trouble when #3 measured 0 psi on a compression check. Nothing was higher than 120 psi. Took a while until the head could come off and we were greeted with the images below. My experience with engines is limited to the periphery (alternators, water pumps) or head gaskets. The idea of replacing valves, stem seals, rings, is a little intimidating.


Automotive tire Rim Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive wheel system

Automotive tire Automotive engine gasket Gas Auto part Asphalt

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bicycle part Rim Engineering

Wood Gas Auto part Metal Machine


Now that the head is removed, I'll likely start looking at disassembly of the head and learning how to clean any good valves. I'm looking for a budget build of sorts. By that I mean it should be sensible (i.e avoid ruining the repair by leaving other ticking time bombs intact) though our youngest's wallet simply can't afford to have someone else do the work or replacement of good parts willy-nilly. The fun part is the decision to keep/replace will be driven by what the internet has to offer as we are new to Mini's.

I'm thinking the parts list will include the following for certain. Patient has 93k miles and is an auto (let me know if I'm missing something!)

1x exhaust valve
16x valve stems seals
head gasket
timing chain kit
oil filter housing gasket
piston rings (can I say this one scares the newbie in me?!?!)

I would like to defer the following until the car proves it won't break again, lol

water pump
Vacuum pump
High Pressure Fuel Pump
Oil pump
Coils

The following are new within our limited ownership

thermostat (dealer before purchase)
water pump cross pipe
valve cover

I'll need to identify new tools for these repairs as well. Wish me luck!
 

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i would suspect the injector for that cylinder might be why the valve cracked in first place , i would to be on safe side replace that injector, ie heat tends to be the reason why the valves break like that from lean out, ie not enough fuel to cool combustion, would also suspect the other 3 valves in that cylinder could be not far off failure as well if this was caused by that cylinder leaning out, good move to repave all 4 valves at same time, deffo do the rings on piston change them to 3 piece solid oil rings a must job sorts out the oil use going forward, link below for a idea of
 

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2005 R53, 2005 R53 lightweight, 2008 R55S, 2012 R58 FJCW, 2014 R60SD All4, 1996 Mini Cooper 35SE.
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looking at those combustion chambers it hasn't been running at its best anyway,

I reckon the exhaust seats will be pitted up, probably contributing to this, plus likely been using oil and inevitably coked up on the back of the valves and in ports,

definitely new rings, lucky it's only valve gone, the alternative is a melted piston which usually damages the bore, so at least you have lower repair costs,
 

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looking at those combustion chambers it hasn't been running at its best anyway,

I reckon the exhaust seats will be pitted up, probably contributing to this, plus likely been using oil and inevitably coked up on the back of the valves and in ports,

definitely new rings, lucky it's only valve gone, the alternative is a melted piston which usually damages the bore, so at least you have lower repair costs,
i've had them where they melt the side of piston and burst the rings out the bottom of skirt before, like you said its burning a lot of oil needs it all doing
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So, time flows differently in my world 😁 Haven't touched the beast since these photos were taken, though the impending arrival of fall says I must get this done soon. Pardon me if this post rambles or seems disjointed; the Internet has many different opinions! Maybe @mike1967 and @ExclusiveWorkshops will feel like dropping in again with some thoughts. My questions are posed with the idea of "what is most likely" as I know diagnosis from afar is not reasonable. By this time next year, the car will hopefully do 1200 miles at a time reliably (home/school commute).

Regarding the head, the broken valve obviously needs to be replaced. Would the head need skimming? I think buying a tool such as this kit would let me service valve seals for both the Cooper and Cooper S in the family?

My plan for this weekend is to remove the pistons and view the bores for damage (fingernail test 😉). Anything special I need to know about removing the pistons? I know marking the caps is needed and the bolts are TTY (one-time). My wish is that the block and pistons are still good. Some folks recommended forged JCW pistons though my read of this forum is that other issues contribute to most failures rather than cast vs. forged.

With the obvious oil consumption, how much concern should I have for the catalytic converter? Anything I can do to check before the engine is working again?

The computer reported good pressure from the HPFP. Should I fret over the HPFP, try an internet rebuild kit or just get a new OE pump?

One piece of good news is the valve cover is brand new so I don't have to worry about catch cans.

The turbo has play in the bearings. Wondering if there are good CHRA to choose from or could R&R wait a bit.

My appreciation to anyone that slogs through this post!
 

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that kit is for the Valvetronic cars, the ad shouldn't include N14 really

I wouldn't skim if no coolant issues prior and no obvious surface concerns evident, save it for when you really do need it sometime is my view on that

cat you can look at with an endoscope for an idea of condition

I'd leave the HPFP, easy to check/change later if ness

'some' play isn't unusual in the turbo journal bearing, if not near the housing again I'd review it later

still worth considering catch can/s
 
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