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...where´s the any-key?
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What a monumental day for Europe!!!

I know this has nothing to do with the Mini, but I feel something this big has to be mentioned.

Here in the UK we have yet to switch, but I would love to know how you all feel about it. I felt quite sad really loosing currencies such as Francs and Guilders.

But it is real, I find it quite unbelievable to be honest; like a dream, I can't imagine using them.

Now Euros are a reality, does it mean that the price of a Mini in France is the same as Holland?


LMB:D
 

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LMB said:
.....Now Euros are a reality, does it mean that the price of a Mini in France is the same as Holland?
That's been the idea for decades and decades, hasn't it? Kind of create a "United States of Europe” through the EU?

Well if you look to the US for an example, car prices are mostly the same throughout all the US states, but sometimes one of the states mandates something that the others don't -- which can affect price. For example, California used to have stricter emission laws than the other 49 states, so cars sold there were just a little different due to extra emission equipment and cost slightly more.

So, for EU countries, it may really depend on how much the lawmakers in Brussels control the situation and simplify the various regulations concerning the sale of automobiles. If the move to the Euro helps increase competition and break down barriers, then that should help people, (such as MINI buyers all over Europe), with better products and better prices, right?
 

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Does it mean that a price of a MINI will be the same in England as in France or Belgium?

Ha ha ha ha.....you've got to dream that one.:D :D
 

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Apial said:
Does it mean that a price of a MINI will be the same in England as in France or Belgium?

Ha ha ha ha.....you've got to dream that one.:D :D
Well, if a MINI eventually is priced the same in France as it is in Belgium, yet remains priced higher in England, then someone has some explaining to do, right?

Won't a situation like that within EU countries bring this pricing discrepancy to a head in due time? I would expect the same thing would eventually bring common pricing of automobile fuel within the EU to the forefront as well.
 

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BruceK said:


Well, if a MINI eventually is priced the same in France as it is in Belgium, yet remains priced higher in England, then someone has some explaining to do, right?

Won't a situation like that within EU countries bring this pricing discrepancy to a head in due time? I would expect the same thing would eventually bring common pricing of automobile fuel within the EU to the forefront as well.
You are forgetting about things like VAT & Duty - These vary between countries whether or not they share a common currency. In addition the differing costs of doing business in different countries will flow through into the overhead structures of the manufacturers & their retail networks, and therefore into the price you pay

Having said all that, Britain has its own oil supply & makes all the world's Minis - So, that's where they should be cheapest to buy & drive right?:eek:
 

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rich said:


You are forgetting about things like VAT & Duty - These vary between countries whether or not they share a common currency. In addition the differing costs of doing business in different countries will flow through into the overhead structures of the manufacturers & their retail networks, and therefore into the price you pay

Having said all that, Britain has its own oil supply & makes all the world's Minis - So, that's where they should be cheapest to buy & drive right?:eek:
I’m certainly no expert on economics, but I'm not really forgetting VAT and duty. I think with the Euro as a common currency, the "extras", a particular government tacks on to a commodity (like tax) will become much more visible by comparison to other countries and therefore more subject to public scrutiny.

For example: Picture living on the border of France and Germany and needing to buy automobile fuel. If a liter of fuel, priced in Euros, is cheaper in France than in Germany, then people who have a choice where to buy fuel will likely choose to buy fuel in France - all other things being equal. And if the price is substantially different between the two countries, the public may want to learn of the reason for the difference, and then judge the reason as valid or invalid as it may relate to government policy.

To give you a more radical example, if the US and the UK used the same currency (let’s say the UK pound), don’t you think the public in both the UK and the US would want to know why a liter of unleaded petrol currently costs 4 times more in the UK than in the US (about £0.80 in the UK vs. about £0.18 in the US)? It boils down to different taxes and duties imposed, the resulting public services offered by each government, how efficiently each government is run, and what the public expectation is from each government.

In short, a common currency, may tend to smooth out obstacles. (Like arbitrary differences in the price of MINIS :) ).
 

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BruceK said:

I’m certainly no expert on economics, but I'm not really forgetting VAT and duty. I think with the Euro as a common currency, the "extras", a particular government tacks on to a commodity (like tax) will become much more visible by comparison to other countries and therefore more subject to public scrutiny.

For example: Picture living on the border of France and Germany and needing to buy automobile fuel. If a liter of fuel, priced in Euros, is cheaper in France than in Germany, then people who have a choice where to buy fuel will likely choose to buy fuel in France - all other things being equal. And if the price is substantially different between the two countries, the public may want to learn of the reason for the difference, and then judge the reason as valid or invalid as it may relate to government policy.

To give you a more radical example, if the US and the UK used the same currency (let’s say the UK pound), don’t you think the public in both the UK and the US would want to know why a liter of unleaded petrol currently costs 4 times more in the UK than in the US (about £0.80 in the UK vs. about £0.18 in the US)? It boils down to different taxes and duties imposed, the resulting public services offered by each government, how efficiently each government is run, and what the public expectation is from each government.

In short, a common currency, may tend to smooth out obstacles. (Like arbitrary differences in the price of MINIS :) ).
Bruce, you are right in saying that a common currency makes these cross-border disparities more obvious. However, plenty of people have already cottoned on to this and cross intra-European borders to stock up on cheaper petrol, tobacco, alcohol... i.e. the fun things in life!

Meanwhile I'm pleased that both my bottle of Aussie Chardonnay and my Subaru Outback cost just 60% of price in UK, and fuel only 40% of UK - It's just a shame the currency buys you peanuts if you try travelling anywhere overseas North of the Equator:rolleyes:
 

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BruceK said:


For example: Picture living on the border of France and Germany and needing to buy automobile fuel. If a liter of fuel, priced in Euros, is cheaper in France than in Germany, then people who have a choice where to buy fuel will likely choose to buy fuel in France - all other things being equal.

This already happens in Northern Ireland / Republic of Ireland. Shops and filling stations near the border on both sides have accepted both sterling and irish pounds for years. People do travel from one side to the other, just to buy fuel. Due to UK taxes, at the moment fuel in Republic of Ireland is considerably cheaper. People travel to the border from Belfast (about 60 miles) with a few jerry cans in the boot and get enough fuel to do them a month, then go over again. I imagine this will continue with the Euro.
 

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makes a lot of sense . . . .

I`ve travelled through Europe on many occasions without too many problems, but what really brought the EU currency differences `home` to me, was in 1998 whilst working in Germany - we had the use of a pre-launch Focus for the weekend and ventured into France.

Not far across the Border in Metz we decided we`d park and have a look round but reluctantly had to park at a pay & display bay - we sorted through an assortment of German (and Luxemburg) coins hoping for a good `fit` but all to no avail.

Reluctantly I had to visit the Bank across the street, just as they were about to close, in order to get the correct coinage!

Euro . . it makes sense !
 
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