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Hello

I have a Cooper 2011, N16, Is it safe to charge the battery while in the car and connected ?
Looks like the original battery and has IBS.

Tia
yes its fine to do this
 

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Thanks Mike,
I read somewhere that the Neg from the charger need to be attached to earth on the car instead the battery earth , is this correct ?
if you were jump starting the car with 1a 700amp battery on a running car yep there are jump cables rules and where to attach them, as you would have ignition off and only a 2am-20amp changer it will be fine never had one spike anything in over 30 years of doing it, as for jump starting it pays to switch head lights on the being jump started car this protects from spike surges ie pulls the currant towards the head light circuit rather than the 5 volt ecu circuits,
 

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This is interesting and some advice would be gratefully received - two cars, 1996 TDi300 Land Rover Defender and 2019MY Countryman PHEV. I leave my cars undriven for 3-4 months at a time as I work overseas but the trickle chargers I use (a Cetek Battery Conditioner on the Defender over the winter but a Maplins Solar panel trickle charger in the summer and just a solar charger on the Countryman) are connected differently....... on the Defender both the chargers get connected with positive to the battery and negative to the body but in the Countryman I was advised to connect the trickle charger to the jump start posts under the bonnet with no connection to the body.
Why would it be different for each car - the last 4 Range Rovers I owned Also connected to the jumpstart posts because I couldn’t plug into any of the sockets as they were disabled by the Battery Management System was the car was locked up, which I assume is why the Countryman is the same as the modern Range Rovers - the 1996 Defender has no hi-tech electronics at all.
I have never suffered a flat battery in any car since connecting them up like this whereas before I had to jump start the modern cars because their batteries died after a month of no use, the battery drain was significant even when the cars went into “sleep” mode, not so with the Defender that only had a clock to power once the ignition was turned off!
 

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This is interesting and some advice would be gratefully received - two cars, 1996 TDi300 Land Rover Defender and 2019MY Countryman PHEV. I leave my cars undriven for 3-4 months at a time as I work overseas but the trickle chargers I use (a Cetek Battery Conditioner on the Defender over the winter but a Maplins Solar panel trickle charger in the summer and just a solar charger on the Countryman) are connected differently....... on the Defender both the chargers get connected with positive to the battery and negative to the body but in the Countryman I was advised to connect the trickle charger to the jump start posts under the bonnet with no connection to the body.
Why would it be different for each car - the last 4 Range Rovers I owned Also connected to the jumpstart posts because I couldn’t plug into any of the sockets as they were disabled by the Battery Management System was the car was locked up, which I assume is why the Countryman is the same as the modern Range Rovers - the 1996 Defender has no hi-tech electronics at all.
I have never suffered a flat battery in any car since connecting them up like this whereas before I had to jump start the modern cars because their batteries died after a month of no use, the battery drain was significant even when the cars went into “sleep” mode, not so with the Defender that only had a clock to power once the ignition was turned off!
its more of a safety thing ie having someone having a charger still switched on charge while disconnecting the clips off a battery that has been gassing for a while in a confined area i have seen this a few times someone forgets and believe me when i say the battery will explode and cover you is warm acid, i've done myself a few times it hurts Avery time, battery fumes are like petrol fumes,, thats one level why they move the connect points, and modern cars the alternators are 150-300 amp as well and battery's get a right good kicking with start stop.
also on some cars where the live feeds connect to stuff like body control and bsm modules and a long piece of wire ir the longest route for electrons to travel cuts down the risk of spiking , but spiking only happens when you add a uncontrolled power feed and allow a spark, see sparks are lightening million micro volts bit like welding if you force rod to metal it sticks and electric flow through it,, but if you allow a gap you get heat lightening this is on controlled this when touching a jump lead to a car is massive,
some cars when locked and go to sleep only draw 200 miliamps others might be 5oo miliamps so run down faster over time
 
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