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2005 Mini Cooper
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48 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone!

Really need some help on this!

I recently changed a rear trailing arm and both brake discs/rotors on my '05 Cooper R50, and since then it has this strange rattling sound when going over uneven road:

Car Rattle Audio

You can hear it very distinctly at 12 seconds and sporadically from there as I go over particular changes in the road surface! The microphone was placed directly in the centre of the boot pointing down, as I'm sure it has to be something to do with the exhaust system/control arms/suspension???

The only thing I can think of - apart from maybe having knocked something loose while I was working under there - is that the bushing on the new trailing arm isn't tight enough? But everything looks and feels solid (including the exhaust system/heat shields) and its been through its MOT since, with an alignment, where surely they would have noticed if the bushing was loose on the control arm? Plus the noise seems to be coming from the centre of the back.

Any help much appreciated.
Garry
 

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8,615 Posts
Great shout - I had to use a 17mm box wrench to hold one side of the droplinks to get the trailing arm off, so maybe I've destroyed the rubber on those. Will have a look, cheers.
best use molgrips when removing the drop links nuts
 

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Premium Member
2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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876 Posts
I was under the impression it is good to replace end links everytime. So I do!
R50's seem to have a problem with the four control arms bending from what I have seen. I would at least take a tape measure when your looking around there and measure the length of each one making certain that the noise you heard did not destroy the geometry in the rear suspension.
But from the sound and the tip in this tread about drop links that tends to be where the sound comes from.
Or believe it or not a improper re install of the rear shock dust boot will make a open plastic flat drum sound. Which is what that sounds like also. In which case you have to remove the shock align the dust boot back up and cut the portion of plastic boot that got frenched(bent!) by the lower shock tube out. Because bending plastic back the way it was still leave the plastic edge of the dust boot too close to the lower part of shock considering the shock is rotatable 360 degrees.
 

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Just to say this nevermind the people say mini r50 is one of the best cars i drove in 25 years ( or i was extraordinatly lucky with it)
 

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2005 Mini Cooper
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48 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Great, cheers guys - spare wheel was never there so everything is as it was before, does sound like some shot rubber or similar - I’ll get under it and report back!
 

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2005 Mini Cooper
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Discussion Starter #10
Guys, thank you so much - it was indeed the rubber on the droplink that was shot, on the side I changed the trailing arm. Must have been over-zealous when undoing it. I fashioned a bit of rubber to fill in the gap and test the theory, and the car was as quiet as ever. New set of droplinks it is!

Thanks again.
 

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Premium Member
2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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876 Posts
The way those drop links go one is a task and half to torque those things. What it is 13pounds or something. At least it was not something else like a control arm bushing or something.
 

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2005 Mini Cooper
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48 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The way those drop links go one is a task and half to torque those things. What it is 13pounds or something. At least it was not something else like a control arm bushing or something.
Yeah, to be honest I’m not sure if it’s just not torqued enough or it’s shot (the end of it moves quite freely). Either way at least it’s only that, like you say.
 

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Premium Member
2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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876 Posts
I like to use a little lube lightly even just motor oil lightly(meaning a rag with a little oil rubbed into it or paper towel; and just wipe the bolts on all of the trailing arm.
One day I was tightening the bolt to the shock got close to the end of installing the bolt and it made a terrible shriek of metal bolt inside aluminum. I backed it out and lube it. Things tend to get real dry down there.
Like that GP mini air diverter they put on the rear bumper. I don't know why they do that(every little bit counts). The car gets enough air flow under the car as is.
 

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Premium Member
2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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876 Posts
I like to use a little lube lightly even just motor oil lightly(meaning a rag with a little oil rubbed into it or paper towel; and just wipe the bolts on all of the trailing arm.
One day I was tightening the bolt to the shock got close to the end of installing the bolt and it made a terrible shriek of metal bolt inside aluminum. I backed it out and lube it. Things tend to get real dry down there.
Like that GP mini air diverter they put on the rear bumper. I don't know why they do that(every little bit counts). The car gets enough air flow under the car as is.
That's what they said to do though during all that. Is to lower the car and put wieght on it before torquing the lower control arms down. I just used to jack stands in the front of the car and wooden 2 by 4 that I made up that were only like 12 inches long and stacked them 4 of them together and screwed them together. At that point just lowered the back wheels on them to give me access to torque under load. Without it the car would have been too low! to the ground for me to torque proper.
 

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Premium Member
2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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876 Posts
That's what they said to do though during all that. Is to lower the car and put wieght on it before torquing the lower control arms down. I just used to jack stands in the front of the car and wooden 2 by 4 that I made up that were only like 12 inches long and stacked them 4 of them together and screwed them together. At that point just lowered the back wheels on them to give me access to torque under load. Without it the car would have been too low! to the ground for me to torque proper.
Of course there were supporting jacks ready to handle it if it slipped something like that. I can't quite remember I have 6 jackstands and do get real careful when I build something like that up. Like when I pull my rear axle out of truck. You know how it goes you get all kinds of stands and floorjacks and safety measures in place.
But in the end I use wood to do the brunt of some of that stuff. Like supporting the engine.
Just something I picked up years ago when I was reading a book at the library; how race car drivers would work on there cars back then and build cars. They would have a Lincoln log type setup and support the entire car up on wooden beams to work on it.
It was probably plywood I was using or something. press board. I remember I did not have that much room like 8 inches of room or anything.
I remember this dude I knew dug a hole out in the center of high ditch and would pull his cars up and change the oil and filter, back in the day. o_O
 
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