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I have a question to ask.

As I can only drive cars that have been adapted for disabled drivers in the way of hand controls, so with the MINI in mind I contacted a adaptions supplier to get a price on fitting or converting the NEW MINI to be driven by hands and I got this reply

To fit hand controls to your 2002 mini is £260 fitted at our works. To fit an indicator into the hand-control can be a problem as the wiring may be Multiplex wiring, if it is we could fit a indicator cross over £45. If you need any more info do not hesitate to contact me.

But my question is regarding the "Wiring" - can someone tell me if the wiring is Multiplex
 

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My understanding is that the MINI, like other modern high-end cars (BMW, Jaguar, etc.), uses a complex multiplexed wiring scheme in place of the tradtional method of hundreds of individual wires bunched together and then branching out to each separate electrical item within the car.

I'll leave it to someone else to provide the multiplex details.... :)
 

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BruceK said:
My understanding is that the MINI, like other modern high-end cars (BMW, Jaguar, etc.), uses a complex multiplexed wiring scheme in place of the tradtional method of hundreds of individual wires bunched together and then branching out to each separate electrical item within the car.
huh?????

:confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:
 

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Multiplex wiring means that the car has it's own computer network. Like Bruce K said, it's to reduce the weight (and cost) of having individual wires running to every device. So things like the auto A/C control unit may only have four wires connected to it: Power/Mains, Ground/Earth, and two wires for the data bus. Signals are sent along the bus to the various controllers responsible for setting the interior/exterior air mix, the relay responsible for the compressor clutch, and the controller(s) for directing air out the dash or through the floor vents.

Multiplex wiring makes it even more important that you choose a ICE installer who knows what he's doing (and is insured). If he were to cut the wrong wire, it's possible that the car may malfunction in strange ways (even if he were to repair his mistake). I don't know about BMW, but some Mercedes dealers I have heard will not honor a warranty repair relating to mistakenly cut wires.

Chip H.
 

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ELISEBOY said:
Can you be a little more specific in your "huh?" ?
 

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Okay, this is not a true example, but a for instance...

To make the brake light go on, you send power down a red wire, and the body acts as the return (black wire).

Simple huh?

Okay, no add left turn, right turn, reverse, parking lights, fog light, hazzard flashers, etc... It's a pretty big bundle of wires.

A multi-plexed wiring system has a few control wires, say three of them, which can produce a number of combinations sufficient to make the right lights light up. The signal is then de-plexed? at the back of the car by a little controller. Imagine this:
+++ Left Turn
--- Right Turn
--+ Brakes
-++ Brake and left turn
-+- Brake and right turn
+-- Reverse
++- Reverse and Brake

I'm sure I don't need to finish to give you the picture. If you added even one more wire, you could control a LOT more functions.

This is how a multi-plexed trailer system works. The MINI might not even switch 12 volt wires, or make any regular sense. It might send a computer signal down some sort of network cabe, which actuates a multi-function controller, which activates the light.

If it were me, I'd bank on the extra 45 quid. Maybe more.
 

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It's not so bad... The system is reasonably reliable, as it's been on BMW's, upscale cars and newer cars for some time now.

It won't be impossible to fit, because I'm sure someone has fit a BMW this way.
 

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Geneva Motorshow

One of the more interesting Geneva concept cars to me was the Bertone Novanta. Its most notable feature is the lack of all traditional car control devices: steering wheel, accelerator pedal, and transmission shift lever. In their place is a hand control incorporating all those features.

For the entire article plus pictures you can visit:
http://www.4car.co.uk/special/motorshow4/main.jsp?pg=2&id=96

Below I have copied the first paragraph of the 4Car piece:

Peer inside the Novanta, and it's hard not notice the complete absence of steering wheel, pedals, gearlever and switchgear. Sit in the driver's seat, however, and you'll be stunned to see the door armrest swing out in front of you to present a Space 1999 style steering wheel complete with a motorcycle-style twist-grip accelerator, squeezable
brake levers and the transmission controls. Bertone calls it the Guida, and it is electrically hooked up to the steering, brakes, transmission, there being no direct
mechanical link to these components, this being a full drive-by-wire car. Sat behind the Guida you are a long, long way from the dashboard and its centrally mounted instrument display, staring through a vast wraparound windscreen reminiscent of a Saab. That's appropriate, because this car is based on a 9-5 - it's powered by the 200 bhp 3.0 V6-although the Swedish company has been too busy to get deeply involved in the Novanta's look.
 
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