MINI Cooper Forum banner

41 - 52 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter #41 (Edited)
I would have sent it if I had a place nearby before I started the task, but now I've done this I'm glad I did it this way , this was one of them tasks I had no control and always relied on someone else. Felt pretty helpless when I couldn't find a machine shop.

Now that I've tackled it it's not a mystery anymore, sure lot more work but I'm doing this as a project so in the end I learned something new. What I liked the most is it gave me the control, I can do it my way.

Going forward I will tackle valve guide jobs in my projects again myself if I can source guides.
Saves a few quid and very satisfying in the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,543 Posts
like anything only a lesson man made man can fix it lol, i tend to do all my own stuff when can cant see point paying someone else to do some thing i can do my self ,, think worst one i ever done was all the valve guides and lap all valves in on bmw v10 M5 and was a mates car that he started off asking me to give him help turned in to him having a wobble when it was very much in bits and he was lost in it,, ie he had stripped it took no pics of anything and i ended up putting it back together again over about 4 weeks in my spare time,,, nothing worst when someone puts all the nuts and bolts in one box, takes parts off and just no order to it etc,, where i keep all bolts and nuts with what it held on and in order of how came off and take loads of pics of everything as well,,, but i did teach him a good lesson on how to store the parts when take off etc,
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
Joined
·
876 Posts
Good Job! And later in your Mini Cooper tasks, You'll find out the computer is a friend really and not anything compared to replacing the hard components or doing the hard jobs. Just make sure you watch for that Valve on the end when installing it. to adjust the spring clamp window toward the exhaust side or the intake side, as when you start to wheel down on it. It will want to slip if you don't!
compresson clamp.jpg
If it does slip re check for any friction on the valve guide by spinning the valve a quarter turn then move back and forth(the valve!). The do another quarter turn and repeat back and forth, until it's gone 360 degrees with no friction spots. I had to replace a valve because of that last valve clamp issue. No big problem just a new valve. Another thing some don't do is figure out how to relax the camshaft for the intake and install the head with out the intake camshaft locked. The rolling the camshaft into place after the head has been sat down. So the number one valves,(the ones that are hard to install do not stand a chance of bumping the block when the cylinder head is installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,543 Posts
Good Job! And later in your Mini Cooper tasks, You'll find out the computer is a friend really and not anything compared to replacing the hard components or doing the hard jobs. Just make sure you watch for that Valve on the end when installing it. to adjust the spring clamp window toward the exhaust side or the intake side, as when you start to wheel down on it. It will want to slip if you don't!
View attachment 280460
If it does slip re check for any friction on the valve guide by spinning the valve a quarter turn then move back and forth(the valve!). The do another quarter turn and repeat back and forth, until it's gone 360 degrees with no friction spots. I had to replace a valve because of that last valve clamp issue. No big problem just a new valve. Another thing some don't do is figure out how to relax the camshaft for the intake and install the head with out the intake camshaft locked. The rolling the camshaft into place after the head has been sat down. So the number one valves,(the ones that are hard to install do not stand a chance of bumping the block when the cylinder head is installed.
i always rebuild the head on the bench before putting back on engine easier by far, and to be honest of someone cant place a head on the block with out hitting a valve well they really should not be doing the job in first place,, also there is a big chance of dropping stuff in to the oil returns to sump and then its a sump off again ,
as for fitting head without locking the crankshaft and head before is silly leaves it open for mistakes and bent valves when trying to find the lock hole ,
also when fitting collets a useful bit if info is use grease on the valve head and can push the collet around without it dropping off with a spike tool ,, also after fitting the collet hit the top of valve head with hammer this ensures the collets are locked to avoid dropping a valve,,
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bilbo

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter #45
Good Job! And later in your Mini Cooper tasks, You'll find out the computer is a friend really and not anything compared to replacing the hard components or doing the hard jobs. Just make sure you watch for that Valve on the end when installing it. to adjust the spring clamp window toward the exhaust side or the intake side, as when you start to wheel down on it. It will want to slip if you don't!
View attachment 280460
If it does slip re check for any friction on the valve guide by spinning the valve a quarter turn then move back and forth(the valve!). The do another quarter turn and repeat back and forth, until it's gone 360 degrees with no friction spots. I had to replace a valve because of that last valve clamp issue. No big problem just a new valve. Another thing some don't do is figure out how to relax the camshaft for the intake and install the head with out the intake camshaft locked. The rolling the camshaft into place after the head has been sat down. So the number one valves,(the ones that are hard to install do not stand a chance of bumping the block when the cylinder head is installed.
Cheers Jonny, tbh I'm confused what you suggested there

I just rebuilt the head on the bench with a valve spring compressor like below, I make sure not to scrape sides of the valve when clamping it down, just try my best to keep the clamp straight.

280465


I use bit of grease and a thin screwdriver like Mike mentioned when doing collets, works ok all the time, exactly like Mike said moderate tap with hammer to make sure collets are in but so far all the heads I've done I never had found any issues after doing collets, just something I've been taught so I just keep doing it

Hope to install two cams and then fit the head in coming weeks.

It's been mental in my day job in last few weeks, and with cold temperatures I couldn't motivate myself to go out and finish off the car. hopefully with warmer temps coming I can start doing some work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,543 Posts
Cheers Jonny, tbh I'm confused what you suggested there

I just rebuilt the head on the bench with a valve spring compressor like below, I make sure not to scrape sides of the valve when clamping it down, just try my best to keep the clamp straight.

View attachment 280465

I use bit of grease and a thin screwdriver like Mike mentioned when doing collets, works ok all the time, exactly like Mike said moderate tap with hammer to make sure collets are in but so far all the heads I've done I never had found any issues after doing collets, just something I've been taught so I just keep doing it

Hope to install two cams and then fit the head in coming weeks.

It's been mental in my day job in last few weeks, and with cold temperatures I couldn't motivate myself to go out and finish off the car. hopefully with warmer temps coming I can start doing some work.
totally with you on all of that ,
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
Joined
·
876 Posts
Cheers Jonny, tbh I'm confused what you suggested there

I just rebuilt the head on the bench with a valve spring compressor like below, I make sure not to scrape sides of the valve when clamping it down, just try my best to keep the clamp straight.

View attachment 280465

I use bit of grease and a thin screwdriver like Mike mentioned when doing collets, works ok all the time, exactly like Mike said moderate tap with hammer to make sure collets are in but so far all the heads I've done I never had found any issues after doing collets, just something I've been taught so I just keep doing it

Hope to install two cams and then fit the head in coming weeks.

It's been mental in my day job in last few weeks, and with cold temperatures I couldn't motivate myself to go out and finish off the car. hopefully with warmer temps coming I can start doing some work.
If you got that far already then it should be good. with new guides even a slightly frictional valve stem on the inside of the guide can straighten itself. The only reason I metioned the cylinder head and favoring removing the camlocks for the actual placement of the cylinder head on to the block is that number one cylinder valves will be open if you leave the locks on. Now it's not a nightmare to set the cylinder head on there with the camshaft locks on the head, but there is a way to do it without having the valves open thereby, making the placement of the cylinder head safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,543 Posts
If you got that far already then it should be good. with new guides even a slightly frictional valve stem on the inside of the guide can straighten itself. The only reason I mentioned the cylinder head and favoring removing the camlocks for the actual placement of the cylinder head on to the block is that number one cylinder valves will be open if you leave the locks on. Now it's not a nightmare to set the cylinder head on there with the camshaft locks on the head, but there is a way to do it without having the valves open thereby, making the placement of the cylinder head safe.
really do pity anyone reading your post and think its ok to rebuild a engine by your views to your way is better than the correct way that all techs who repair these cars stick by, ie one way the right way,,
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bilbo

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter #49
If you got that far already then it should be good. with new guides even a slightly frictional valve stem on the inside of the guide can straighten itself. The only reason I metioned the cylinder head and favoring removing the camlocks for the actual placement of the cylinder head on to the block is that number one cylinder valves will be open if you leave the locks on. Now it's not a nightmare to set the cylinder head on there with the camshaft locks on the head, but there is a way to do it without having the valves open thereby, making the placement of the cylinder head safe.
I'm not planning to fit cam locks before fitting the head , I always make sure valves don't hit pistons when putting the head down by making sure checking the level of the pistons. if the crank timing is set all pistons at halfway (like in r56) then I make sure crank is at the right timing mark before putting the head on . and then I know no matter what I do valves won't be damage.

If the timing is set at a certain piston at TDC, I'd get the timing right on crank first and then back half turn to make sure there is enough gap for valve travel even if I have to turn the cams 360 degrees. Then fit the head , get timing marks on the cams lined up or fit cam locks , then turn the crank half turn forward to get timing marks right on the crank. then fit timing belt or chain.

Maybe above aren't the exact ways described and taught in books and colleges,it's all about knowing where the valves and pistons are and which way they will be travelling when you turn them clockwise or anti clockwise etc

bit of common sense really.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,543 Posts
I'm not planning to fit cam locks before fitting the head , I always make sure valves don't hit pistons when putting the head down by making sure checking the level of the pistons. if the crank timing is set all pistons at halfway (like in r56) then I make sure crank is at the right timing mark before putting the head on . and then I know no matter what I do valves won't be damage.

If the timing is set at a certain piston at TDC, I'd get the timing right on crank first and then back half turn to make sure there is enough gap for valve travel even if I have to turn the cams 360 degrees. Then fit the head , get timing marks on the cams lined up or fit cam locks , then turn the crank half turn forward to get timing marks right on the crank. then fit timing belt or chain.

Maybe above aren't the exact ways described and taught in books and colleges,it's all about knowing where the valves and pistons are and which way they will be travelling when you turn them clockwise or anti clockwise etc

bit of common sense really.
your right i do same thing ie on engines like the prince engine where the timing lock points are at 50% travel of pistons ie all all height in bores dont need to lock head off, but if its a tdc lock point i will always lock both the head and crank before putting together as its possible to catch a valve if turn wrong direction on crank ,, took a prince engined car for emissions test today went through 0.1 hc and so low on rest at 3000 revs ,, proof its a good engine good day the mill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter #51
I think my practice of not locking the cams comes from doing many head gasket jobs on old cars which had no locking tools, mainly timing belt ones where you have a woodruff key on the cam sprocket where we have to align a timing mark or our own tipex marks, so half turn backward and forward method worked for us in those cases, that practice just stuck with me even when I have access to locking tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,543 Posts
I think my practice of not locking the cams comes from doing many head gasket jobs on old cars which had no locking tools, mainly timing belt ones where you have a woodruff key on the cam sprocket where we have to align a timing mark or our own tipex marks, so half turn backward and forward method worked for us in those cases, that practice just stuck with me even when I have access to locking tools.
i.ve messed up before and torqued the head down and on twin cam engines thought the cams were in safe position to find I slightly bent a valve ,, not very good when its what I do for living so these days learnt a process that never changes and always includes locking stuff when lock tools are used 100% all the time and so far i've never repeated any me caused damage since,, seen many other fall in same pit after i say really should use them lock tools and know fore sure.. also when i help trainee apprentices learn stuff then its best to keep to the correct ways of doing such jobs,, really hate failing ie telling owner sorry your car will be another week because i'm a plum and messed up dont nice feeling,,
had someone on here reckon they done a timing chain on a cooper s without using any lock tools by removing cam shafts , impossible to do correctly,, trouble is when someone writes anything on a forum it dont mean they know what they are on about its scary for some people who believe hat they say is a correct way of doing something etc, hence why i only comment on stuff i have done and know how to do etc, i can tell know what your doing and sounds like do well with it,
 
41 - 52 of 52 Posts
Top