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How much extra would you pay for a diesel engine option in the US?

  • Nothing - would not pay more for diesel engine.

    Votes: 1 8.3%
  • $500

    Votes: 3 25.0%
  • $1500

    Votes: 5 41.7%
  • $3000

    Votes: 3 25.0%
  • $4000 or more

    Votes: 0 0.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was talking with Mini USA and I was asked to post, "How much more would you be willing to pay for the DIESEL upgrade as a option in the USA?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you.

I would love for Mini to offer the Copper D! If we get enough people, they will bring it to America!
 

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I firmly believe that a Mini D in the US should be sold for the same price as the baseline petrol. Or at most tag on an addition $500.

When looking at the difference in fuel consumption of the base petrol motor vs the diesel, combined with the (relatively) cheap price of petrol in the US, paying more than $500 extra just doesn't make sense.

Let's assume the petrol engine gets 35mpg and the diesel 55mpg. With an average cost of fuel at $3.25, and an average driving distance of 12,000 miles per year, at the end of 5 years the diesel will have saved you only $2000. And that number is a bit optimistic.

Consider the price of diesel in the US costs more than regular petrol (even the 93 octane). Also any premium you pay for an optional diesel engine is likely to be added on your car loan, amortized over 5 years, thus reducing savings even further.

This is another reason BMW doesn't see a point in bringing the diesel Mini to the states
 

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I firmly believe that a Mini D in the US should be sold for the same price as the baseline petrol. Or at most tag on an addition $500.

When looking at the difference in fuel consumption of the base petrol motor vs the diesel, combined with the (relatively) cheap price of petrol in the US, paying more than $500 extra just doesn't make sense.

Let's assume the petrol engine gets 35mpg and the diesel 55mpg. With an average cost of fuel at $3.25, and an average driving distance of 12,000 miles per year, at the end of 5 years the diesel will have saved you only $2000. And that number is a bit optimistic.

Consider the price of diesel in the US costs more than regular petrol (even the 93 octane). Also any premium you pay for an optional diesel engine is likely to be added on your car loan, amortized over 5 years, thus reducing savings even further.

This is another reason BMW doesn't see a point in bringing the diesel Mini to the states
The reason the Mini Cooper D isn't sold in the US isn't because BMW doesn't see a point, but because it is very hard to get a diesel to pass the US emissions!

The only way you'll get the diesel for the same price as the petrol is if BMW put the price of the petrol car up - the diesel engine costs a lot more to make than the petrol one. In the UK, we pay just over £1300 more for the diesel, however that includes the taxes paid all in, registration etc in the UK, so I think a figure around $1,500 would be a reasonable guess.
 

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I am a big Cooper D fan, the torque figure matches the Cooper S and you get significantly more MPG. I found it just a better car to drive than the standard Cooper. In real world performance it probably fits between the Cooper and the S, so any price premium needs to be seen in that context. They probably also hold their second hand value slightly better than the more common Cooper.
 

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With the high cost of Diesel relative to 91 octane gasoline, and the bad reputation Diesel cars have in the US, it would be a hard sell to tack on much over a MC. On the other hand, I would love to see it sold. Maybe I should lie on the pole and say $3K rather than the $0K that it would need to be to move than a few units?
 

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I understand the reputation point, diesel in Europe has a better 'image', in part because of tax breaks of one form or another and the VW TDI engines which made diesels accessible and quick. I had forgotten the low octane rating of US petrol (ours starts at 95 and goes up to 98/99) which means there would be a noticeable performance advantage over the standard MC, even if the BHP figures aren't that different, the torque from a diesel is 'massive'.
 

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I understand the reputation point, diesel in Europe has a better 'image', in part because of tax breaks of one form or another and the VW TDI engines which made diesels accessible and quick. I had forgotten the low octane rating of US petrol (ours starts at 95 and goes up to 98/99) which means there would be a noticeable performance advantage over the standard MC, even if the BHP figures aren't that different, the torque from a diesel is 'massive'.
VW does sell the TDI engined cars in the US. My daily driver was a Golf TDI until recently. But that car is not common. I can't think of how many times station attendants came running out to keep me from ruining my engine by filling it up with Diesel.

BTW - US gasoline is not lower in octane. The AKI octane rating averages RON and MON ratings. Since the MON rating is generally lower by 8-10 points, AKI gives a number 4-5 points lower than using RON alone. The 93 AKI perium I filled up with this morning would probably be 98 RON.
 
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