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The higher temp bulb will give you more blue color, however you will get less brightness on the road. Because the stock bulb give you close to day light brightness.
Usually the stock bulb is around 4000k. You can buy 6000k or 9000k bulb for the blue or purple color.
So it is either practical or just for the look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys

nice..thanks for ur help guys..and yea i really like 8000k. And anothoer question, What can i do to match does side lights/turn signals on the bumper to match my HID? cuz they're are yellowish.
 

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I have tried to get some infomation on the leagility of Xenons and bulbs etc and changing the Discharge output. The best I could do was this (copied and pasted from another forum) This is a response from a representitive from the Department of Transport (uk)

Have received the following guidance from The Department of Transport.........

Dear Sir,

The situation for Gas Discharge (HID High Intensity Discharge) (commonly known as Xenon) headlamps is complex.

I attach links to the Road Vehicle Lighting Regulations 1989 which regulate the situation in the UK.
Under these Regulations Xenon headlamps are not mentioned and therefore they are not permitted according to the strict letter of the law.

However you will be well aware that new vehicles have Xenon headlamps. This is because they comply to European type approval Regulations. The UK cannot refuse to register a vehicle with a European type approval. These are to ECE Regulation 98 (for the Xenon headlamps which are tested on a rig in a laboratory) and ECE Regulation 48 (Lighting Installation on the vehicle).

For the aftermarket, a used vehicle cannot obtain type approval because it is only applicable for new vehicles. However we feel that saying "Xenon is banned in the aftermarket" would not be reasonable. Instead we should make analogies with new vehicles. It would be reasonable to require Xenon in the aftermarket to meet the same safety standards as on new vehicles. The same level of safety should apply.

Therefore a Xenon headlamp sold in the aftermarket should:

1. be type approved to ECE Regulation 98 as a component.
2. when fitted to the vehicle should enable ECE Regulation 48 to be complied with (although no government inspection will take place).
3, Comply with RVLR as far as "use" is concerned.

In practice this means:

1. The headlamp unit (outer lens, reflector, bulb) shall be type approved to ECE 98 and be "e-marked" to demonstrate this. That can only be done by the headlamp supplier - Hella, Valeo etc. who must test the headlamp in an independent laboratory.
2. Once fitted to the vehicle it must have headlamp cleaning and self-levelling (which can be for the headlamp or can be in the vehicle suspension - some expensive estate cars have "self-levelling suspension" and that is adequate). Also the dipped beam must stay on with the main beam.
3. The headlamp must be maintained in good working order, kept clean, and aligned/adjusted correctly like any other headlamp.

Hope that helps.

***

We are aware of kit available in the aftermarket where a Xenon "burner" or bulb is fitted inside a headlamp designed for use with conventional Halogen filament bulbs. The burner is fitted with a "bayonet" type fitting so it fits where the Halogen bulb should fit. This is not legal and the vendor, the person who mounts it on the vehicle and the person who drives the vehicle are all committing an offence. (Which also means that he is invalidating the insurance.)
The reason for this is that headlamps and bulbs are made to tight tolerances and the wrong type of bulb will cause an incorrect beam pattern to be emitted, which could cause dazzle and discomfort to other drivers.


So from what I can see-Technically you can change the Factory Xenon Bulbs to another with a different Discharge amount?
May look into doing this next year and upgrade to 8000k.
Has anyone else done this?
 

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But with 8000k there is more Discharge than the 4000 odd out of Factory Lamps so wouldn't it be brighter?
They use these lamps on the more Executive vehicles like Top Mercedes and BMW's.
From what I can see there is no mention of maximum Output from a Xenon bulb-as long as it has a Washer and self levelling mechanism as per that guidance from the DOT?
 

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interceptor said:
But with 8000k there is more Discharge than the 4000 odd out of Factory Lamps so wouldn't it be brighter?
The problem is the color of the discharge. More discharge doesn't mean you can see much clear. Imagine you had a normal flash light and a flash light with blue tint... the normal one will give you more visibility regardless the blue flash light is using 1000W bulb.
interceptor said:
They use these lamps on the more Executive vehicles like Top Mercedes and BMW's.
I believe the 8, 7, or 6 even the M series are using 4000k bulb. I don't think BMW is using any 6000k or 8000k bulb on any of their car.
 

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It has been mentioned in here but maybe not explained thouroughly. The numbers 4000K, 6000K, 8000K and 10000K refer to the temperature of the color of the light, not the light output. The K refers to temperature in degrees Kelvin.

There is a very good article here http://www.danielsternlighting.com/ about HID lighting and what makes for good lights and bad lights. It sure isn't about blue color or more watts.

Take the time to read it, it is well worth it. If only so that you don't waste your money on something that isn't going to work properly.

There is a particularly good section about proper aiming of headlights. I think most MINIs come thru with improperly aimed lights, at least in the USA. It made all the difference in the world after I re-aimed my lights according to his instructions. I do not have people flipping me off as I approach so I am reasonabl;y sure that I am not dazzling them.

I have the Xenon lights and was very underimpressed with the output (or so I thought). After reading Mr. Stern's work I re-aimed my lights and it made a fantastic difference. Twenty minutes well spent.

A word of warning when adjusting MINI Xenons, it only takes very small movement of the adjuster screw to make significant changes in the light pattern (it has been said in here that people have damaged the self-leveling mechanism by making to large an adjustment). I only moved the screw one facet of the head at a time (It will make sense when you see them). It is easier to do this if you use a mirror and a flashlight/torch to find the screws on the back of the housing. The directions for turning the screws is cast into the housing. You can use a coin to do the turning. A little patience will yield big improvements.
 

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Bilbo Baggins said:
It has been mentioned in here but maybe not explained thouroughly. The numbers 4000K, 6000K, 8000K and 10000K refer to the temperature of the color of the light, not the light output. The K refers to temperature in degrees Kelvin.

There is a very good article here http://www.danielsternlighting.com/ about HID lighting and what makes for good lights and bad lights. It sure isn't about blue color or more watts.

Take the time to read it, it is well worth it. If only so that you don't waste your money on something that isn't going to work properly.

There is a particularly good section about proper aiming of headlights. I think most MINIs come thru with improperly aimed lights, at least in the USA. It made all the difference in the world after I re-aimed my lights according to his instructions. I do not have people flipping me off as I approach so I am reasonabl;y sure that I am not dazzling them.

I have the Xenon lights and was very underimpressed with the output (or so I thought). After reading Mr. Stern's work I re-aimed my lights and it made a fantastic difference. Twenty minutes well spent.

A word of warning when adjusting MINI Xenons, it only takes very small movement of the adjuster screw to make significant changes in the light pattern (it has been said in here that people have damaged the self-leveling mechanism by making to large an adjustment). I only moved the screw one facet of the head at a time (It will make sense when you see them). It is easier to do this if you use a mirror and a flashlight/torch to find the screws on the back of the housing. The directions for turning the screws is cast into the housing. You can use a coin to do the turning. A little patience will yield big improvements.

This guy knows what he is talking about :D . If your lights arent bright enough, tey re-aligning them. Mine were misaligned right from the dealer, so dont be surprised if your's are too. Its a simple process especially in the mini with the exposed headlight housings.

Light output is actually meausered in lumens not in temperature. The temperature is the color. As the Temperature goes up, the lumens go down; decreasing light output and thus visibility.
 

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interceptor said:
But with 8000k there is more Discharge than the 4000 odd out of Factory Lamps so wouldn't it be brighter?
They use these lamps on the more Executive vehicles like Top Mercedes and BMW's.
From what I can see there is no mention of maximum Output from a Xenon bulb-as long as it has a Washer and self levelling mechanism as per that guidance from the DOT?

Bother mercedes and BMW use bulbs around 4000-5000k on all of their cars. There isnt a car company out there that offers in the range of 8000k stock on their car. It wouldnt provide enough light for driving at night. i think if you look at 5000k or 4500k bulbs you will be happy with the blue tint AND they are still very bright. They are much more blue then you would expect....you dont need to go up to 8000k, that is like solid blue.
 
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