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2011 R55 Clubman 145k bought 4/2019
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all. Newbie poster. Long time watcher.

While doing a timing chain on our ‘11 Clubman R55. 145K with death rattle when I pulled the hub to free the timing chain. The OIl Pump Sprocket came along for the ride. Going to have to install a new hub and upper oil pump sprocket. Any advice or tricks to install it? Just press fitted? Thanks all!
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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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OK if you have not already completed the project at that point I would clean everything with brake cleaner. Including the snot of the crankshaft. Of course the oil pan should come off and clean the area's of both the chains that the sprockets will be sitting on.
With the oil pump gear back into it's original place on the snout of the crankshaft all associated components dried. Some people at this point would take scotch bright and lightly scour the hub assembly shaft. As you will have a new one there is really no need to. But to use brake cleaner on the hub assembly anyway and dry it off(potential factory grease to keep it shiny and not rust needs to be removed).
[Interlude] Wow this is reminding me of all the stress I went through. Let me take a minute here.
O.K. with the new timing chain assembly(chain and two lower guides zip tied together lower the crank sprocket down into the area(now this is why your oil pan has been removed). Look under the engine and see that the crank gear with the chain and the oil pump gear with it's chain are aligned(meaning the sprockets are parallel as in your picture of the hub assembly only with the chain on them!
Now this is gonna be my opinion of doing it. Number 1. I would carefully thread the crank bolt in with my fingers until the crank bolt is secure; all the while holding the hub assembly with the other hand. Once the bolt is finger tight, i would look back under the engine and make sure those sprocket teeth are aligned.
Not jumping track but if you have a floor jack with a piece of wood under the oil pan or jack stand you are gonna have to fashsion a small piece of wood to go under the engine without the oil pan on it. a piece of wood roughly 8 inches long by 1INCH wide and place that wood under the outer wall of the engine with a jackstand under it. That way you can still see the sprockets from under the engine.
If sprockets are still aligned after hand tightening them. Now it is time to torque that crank bolt to 40 or as per standard torque for THAT phase, but what I would do is attach the hub assembly holder tool to the hub assembly handle facing out past the bumper. Then I would use a floorjack and lightly set the tool handle on that floorjack. All the while the hub is held stationary. Like when I held it to hand tighten only the tool is doing it now. With all that balanced and fixed. I would torque to 40 or whatever the torque rating is.
Then I would mark the crank bolt. Now this is where I designed a special plate
001.JPG
This plate is standard steel garden pebble sidewalk edging you can get at any local horticulture place. I fashioned it out with a notch for the subframe and a round circle for the short socket extension; it sits flush aligned with the crankshaft bolt. (So that is two things that are on the engine this brace to hold the extension wrench whlie I turn it(I use a quick grip clamp to hold it against the subframe); and the hub assembly holder tool holding the hub in a fixed position as to not disturb the sprocket from moving while tightening the bolt).
Then I add electrical tape to the inside of my 18mm socket. The forces being applied with the breaker bar will smear the bolt it's not quite 18mm!
Now it is time to turn that crank bolt 180 degree's. mark the bolt on one of the hex points of the crank bolt and turn in strokes until the mark on the bolt is opposite from where the mark was to begin with.
Now keep in mind the hub holder tool held the sprockets in place during each of the wrench phases but inbetween it does not hurt to slightly left and reset the tip of the hub holder handle on the rubber pad on the floor jack that you have custom set to fix the position of the crank sprocket during the procedure. Make sure things there don't go obtuse.
And that geometry is maintained.
With that part done. I will continue there to install the serpentine belt tensioner and any other item. Installing the harmonic balancer last. Then I mark on the harmonic balancer as the flywheel pin is in dead center(or what used to be top dead center). I mark the balancer right where the upper engine meets the lower engine seam. Then I know if it drifts or whats going on when other fuel injection things not running right after the timing of the car. So I know that timing is dead on.
Then I move to the camshaft timing. If you have purchased a good timing set I will not bore you with the way I do that.
To make a long story short I torque at 14 or whatever the required torque is with someone holding a 27mm wrench on the intake camshaft. Then I move to the exhaust and torque that at the same. I move back to the intake with someone holding the camshaft with the 27mm wrench then I turn the wrench 90 degree's with a torque angle tool on my wrench.
Then I move to the exhaust and do the same. 90 degree's. Then I move back to the intake for the final 90 degree's. Then I move back to the exhaust for 45 degree's(I heard some people with problems breaking cam bolts in the camshaft I figure going another 90 is too much. But I have only gone 90 before on my exhaust and smashed the valves so I go 135 degrees on the exhaust not 90 degree's.
That's about it. clean the sprocket for the camshafts and the cam snouts as well! everything else is by the book!
 

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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
Joined
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1,017 Posts
OK if you have not already completed the project at that point I would clean everything with brake cleaner. Including the snot of the crankshaft. Of course the oil pan should come off and clean the area's of both the chains that the sprockets will be sitting on.
With the oil pump gear back into it's original place on the snout of the crankshaft all associated components dried. Some people at this point would take scotch bright and lightly scour the hub assembly shaft. As you will have a new one there is really no need to. But to use brake cleaner on the hub assembly anyway and dry it off(potential factory grease to keep it shiny and not rust needs to be removed).
[Interlude] Wow this is reminding me of all the stress I went through. Let me take a minute here.
O.K. with the new timing chain assembly(chain and two lower guides zip tied together lower the crank sprocket down into the area(now this is why your oil pan has been removed). Look under the engine and see that the crank gear with the chain and the oil pump gear with it's chain are aligned(meaning the sprockets are parallel as in your picture of the hub assembly only with the chain on them!
Now this is gonna be my opinion of doing it. Number 1. I would carefully thread the crank bolt in with my fingers until the crank bolt is secure; all the while holding the hub assembly with the other hand. Once the bolt is finger tight, i would look back under the engine and make sure those sprocket teeth are aligned.
Not jumping track but if you have a floor jack with a piece of wood under the oil pan or jack stand you are gonna have to fashsion a small piece of wood to go under the engine without the oil pan on it. a piece of wood roughly 8 inches long by 1INCH wide and place that wood under the outer wall of the engine with a jackstand under it. That way you can still see the sprockets from under the engine.
If sprockets are still aligned after hand tightening them. Now it is time to torque that crank bolt to 40 or as per standard torque for THAT phase, but what I would do is attach the hub assembly holder tool to the hub assembly handle facing out past the bumper. Then I would use a floorjack and lightly set the tool handle on that floorjack. All the while the hub is held stationary. Like when I held it to hand tighten only the tool is doing it now. With all that balanced and fixed. I would torque to 40 or whatever the torque rating is.
Then I would mark the crank bolt. Now this is where I designed a special plate
View attachment 279895
This plate is standard steel garden pebble sidewalk edging you can get at any local horticulture place. I fashioned it out with a notch for the subframe and a round circle for the short socket extension; it sits flush aligned with the crankshaft bolt. (So that is two things that are on the engine this brace to hold the extension wrench whlie I turn it(I use a quick grip clamp to hold it against the subframe); and the hub assembly holder tool holding the hub in a fixed position as to not disturb the sprocket from moving while tightening the bolt).
Then I add electrical tape to the inside of my 18mm socket. The forces being applied with the breaker bar will smear the bolt it's not quite 18mm!
Now it is time to turn that crank bolt 180 degree's. mark the bolt on one of the hex points of the crank bolt and turn in strokes until the mark on the bolt is opposite from where the mark was to begin with.
Now keep in mind the hub holder tool held the sprockets in place during each of the wrench phases but inbetween it does not hurt to slightly left and reset the tip of the hub holder handle on the rubber pad on the floor jack that you have custom set to fix the position of the crank sprocket during the procedure. Make sure things there don't go obtuse.
And that geometry is maintained.
With that part done. I will continue there to install the serpentine belt tensioner and any other item. Installing the harmonic balancer last. Then I mark on the harmonic balancer as the flywheel pin is in dead center(or what used to be top dead center). I mark the balancer right where the oil pan meets the lower engine. Then I know if it drifts or whats going on when other fuel injection things not running right after the timing of the car. So I know that timing is dead on.
Then I move to the camshaft timing. If you have purchased a good timing set I will not bore you with the way I do that.
To make a long story short I torque at 14 or whatever the required torque is with someone holding a 27mm wrench on the intake camshaft. Then I move to the exhaust and torque that at the same. I move back to the intake with someone holding the camshaft with the 27mm wrench then I turn the wrench 90 degree's with a torque angle tool on my wrench.
Then I move to the exhaust and do the same. 90 degree's. Then I move back to the intake for the final 90 degree's. Then I move back to the exhaust for 45 degree's(I heard some people with problems breaking cam bolts in the camshaft I figure going another 90 is too much. But I have only gone 90 before on my exhaust and smashed the valves so I go 135 degrees on the exhaust not 90 degree's.
That's about it. clean the sprocket for the camshafts and the cam snouts as well! everything else is by the book!
Of course you can tighten the crank bolt with the upper mount in place you just have to take off when you tighten the camshaft. Your option to put the oil pan back on after the crank bolt. If you don't have the engine holding tool that connects where the alternator is floor jack under the oil pan if you want of course I would use the old oil pan gasket and replace it when all is said and done.:geek:
 

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the pump chain sprocket unless you keep it in place will often come forward, it just slides back on,

no need to align the two bottom sprockets, the pump doesn't get timed,
 
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2011 R55 Clubman 145k bought 4/2019
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input and advice. Job not yet completed. New hub and both sprockets on order. Will be here this week. Plan is to install the over weekend. Including timimg chain and dropping pan to be sure all good and chain is on pump sprocket. Fingers crossed she’ll run after all this.
 

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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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I replaced my hub also. New hubs are nice and shiny and slick going onto the snout of the crankshaft. I replaced my harmonic balancer also(the chrome one) The old black one had a glob of black rubber inbetween the two pieces of metal that make up the harmonic balancer coming out. As long as you have the book. anyway.
Looks like the N18 anyway so you won't have to deal with the exhaust camshaft at any degree aside of the 180 degrees it requires after torque.
 

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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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1,017 Posts
I hope your doing OK. Hope you had nice dry cam bolts; then just took a little motor oil and lightly dob them. And then clean them off with a paper towel. I hope you adjusted the test tensioner to the point where the plastic guide holds the chain in it. and is tighter enough to give the plastic guide a rigid movement back and forth(toward the drivers side toward the passengers side).
I hope you had a good timing kit. I hope you had someone hold the intake camshaft with a 27mm wrench. I hope your mini cooper works for you again!:)
 

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2011 R55 Clubman 145k bought 4/2019
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Discussion Starter #10
280006
Unfortunately...... all went well for about 110 miles. Then the crank bolt (18 mm) backed out while driving. Either i didnt torque it correctly to 50nm + 180 or the hub was bad which caused additional vibration causing the issue. Pride aside, either way now it has no compression due to bent valves. Time to pull the head. Send for rebuild and reinstall. Ive done other chains on other makes. Lots of crank bolts. But this is first failure ive had.
 

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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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I've been there on that. It makes it so much more tense the next time around. cleaning the crank snout with brake cleaner,and the two gears on the hub. Not paying attention so much to the idea that the crank gears need to move around on the hub, AS MUCH AS THE IDEA, THAT THEY........MUST REMAIN STATIONARY. during the procedure. In order to set the truth the sprocket gears must be aligned.
001.JPG
parallel teeth. The way I did that was line the teeth up. look between the hub and the circle of the block where the seal goes. Then set both chains. Then attached the hub holder tool. Then looked under the block with the oil pan off made sure those sprockets were aligned. Then propped the end of the hub holder tool with a floor jack to make sure. that hub would NOT MOVE. there by those sprockets don't move. and the other tool I made so no
deflection of the wrench and short extension would occur. At that point torquing down to specification. Marking the bolt head with a marker on one of the hex corners. Then beginning to turn that mark until it reaches the opposite side. But each time I would push the wrench. I would carefully lift the handle of the hub holder(just a small bit to reset it on the rubber pad of the floor jack,maintaining the geometry.(not like it really really matters)).
Don't forget in all the mist of this thread where your talking about the crank bolt. And what may have went wrong. To clean the intake and exhaust camshaft gears(vanos). with brake cleaner, And dob a bit of oil on the new bolts. and pat dry with a paper towel. Just to where the threads sparkle; from oil. That's what I would do.
 

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View attachment 280006 Unfortunately...... all went well for about 110 miles. Then the crank bolt (18 mm) backed out while driving. Either i didnt torque it correctly to 50nm + 180 or the hub was bad which caused additional vibration causing the issue. Pride aside, either way now it has no compression due to bent valves. Time to pull the head. Send for rebuild and reinstall. Ive done other chains on other makes. Lots of crank bolts. But this is first failure ive had.
Did you use brand new stretch bolts on the camshafts and crankshaft ? I only ask as I bought my 2007 Mini with N12 engine as a non-runner. It transpired that the garage who put a new timing chain on for the previous owner, re-used the old bolts (which is a no-no) and exactly the same thing happened on that. Ran OK for a couple of days then refused to start. The crank bolt had loosened, sprocket slipped and some valves got bent.
 

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Did you use brand new stretch bolts on the camshafts and crankshaft ? I only ask as I bought my 2007 Mini with N12 engine as a non-runner. It transpired that the garage who put a new timing chain on for the previous owner, re-used the old bolts (which is a no-no) and exactly the same thing happened on that. Ran OK for a couple of days then refused to start. The crank bolt had loosened, sprocket slipped and some valves got bent.
MUST NEVER REUSE THOSE BOLTS TOTAL NO NO ON THESE ENGINES WILL END BADLY EVERY TIME.. also should spray brake cleaner around where it all has a inference fit so oil free and dry ,, only the bolts are lightly oiled just before doing up
 

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Followed your advice when repairing it to the letter @mike1967 and so far it's still running well 18 months later!
nice to know matey i do try and give all the info needed to get a good outcome with them,, like I say i'm repairing cars all week every week .. i even get the odd speed boat to play with engine jobs as well funny how word gets around ie i like a challenge,, think worst one was a mates bmw M5 v10 he had stripped it to do engine rebuild after timing chain snapped and then could not work out how to put it back together again,, was on that bloody thing best part of 3 weeks every evening and weekends chipping away at it,, done it he still got the car still beats it to death again no doubt,, when he does think i might change my phone number nasty job
 
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