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This is my first post here, so hope it goes well:

After reading up on the posts regarding broken glove box door latches, no one seems to have attempted to repair theirs fully. With a new glove box assembly running in the $200 range, I figured that I'd give it a go and if I broke it, well I'd have had to spend the $200 anyway. Their was a lot of concern on other post regarding the sonic welding of the inner and outer doors, but I've had some success with getting around this on other things.

My door was popping open at any bump, which wasn't too bad when alone but made passengers (and my wife when she drove the car) upset.

Here's what I did:

First, remove the glove box assembly. This is real easy. Removing five Torx screws frees it up. One on each side edge, two on the upper inside edge and one in the very back wall of the box. Label your screws as they are not all the same. Slide the box out until you can reach the light assembly. Looking from the top, you'll see a tab on one end that needs a little push to free it from its hole. Once it's out, wiggle it back through the hole and let dangle while you do the rest. The AC tube will drop to the floor when the box comes out.

Once the box is out, find a suitable workplace such as a workbench or your mom's dining room table. Put a towel down to catch any small parts from bouncing away. Remove the tensioner on the side using a hex key or luckily fitting flat screwdriver.


Remove the push nut on one end of the hinge rod by carefully prying it with a small flat screwdriver, working around the nut evenly. Once off, slide the rod out the other end. Don't worry about the white nylon inserts, as they seem pressed into their holes and don't come out.

Now, the fun part. The two halves are sonically welded together. Get a couple flat, strong wide objects to pry these apart. I used some wood chisels. Screwdrivers are too narrow and will damage the edges of the plastic. Insert one of the tools into the separation, and then the other next to it. By taking turns pushing one forward and one back, you'll eventually hear a pop or crack. Congrats! One weld broken and many more to go. Now just patiently start working around the perimeter until it seems the edge welds are all popped. Now get a little more enthusiastic and push harder, working around again. The interior welds will start popping. See the photos for locations of the welds and concentrate there. I count 34 or 35 welds.


I didn't know where or how many, so I just kept going. The very interior ones are tough. You just have to take a deep breath and pull the pieces apart. The plastic seems quite sturdy, so I didn't feel there was any danger of breaking it.

Viola! Two pieces. Once in there, you can see your latch and it's problem. Take some pics and note the position of all the pieces before disassembly! I didn't and it added half an hour to the job.

My latch was wobbly, and once in I saw that one side was broken.



Some standard five minute epoxy and care got the broken piece back in place.


I applied a fillet of glue along the breaks where it would not interfere with the latch pieces for additional strength.

Once it's all dry, reassemble the latch and put it back in place.

Make sure all the broken welds are clear of obstruction. Mix up a good quantity of 5 minute epoxy, and working quickly, put a dollop on each of the weld spots. Press the inner piece back in place, and weight it down. Go get a sandwich and when you're done you're ready to reinstall your door hinge rod. Slightly flatten the rod's push nut you took off, and press it back on using a socket slightly larger than the rod. Make sure the cone points out so it slides on easily.

Reinstall the tensioner.


Pop the light fixture back in, slide the box in place and replace the screws. Climb under and pop the AC tube back in place. Pat yourself on the back and go look for some bumps to test your work!
 

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Zanhar25
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Thanks for posting this. My sons Mini glove box was broken as you described and after looking on eBay for a second hand one and see they cost around £100 for a second hand unit I thought I'd search the net to see if anyone had a fix. I came across your post. I followed it through start to finish and successfully repaired it. I was Very pleased and all it cost me was £5 for a tube of Araldite.
Thanks again.

I can't believe no one else has commented on your post.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nearly three years and still works like new. I think LOTS of things on these Gen1 MINIs were rushed into production without much testing.
 

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2006 Mini Cooper S glove box latch broken

I believe I have come up with a perfect solution for glove box staying open. Unfortunately, as we all know Mini provides no latch separate assemblies for 2006 Mini's. My options were to replace complete glove compartment costing me $260. Found others on websites, about $150 with self install, which I'm not comfortable with.

Here's my simple, (takes about 30 minutes) and inexpensive solution, (costing a total of $9.00) that works like a charm! Think it also gives my Mini a sporty look!

You'll need to purchase heavy duty Velcro with a sticky side and 2 cloth belts with double D rings (bot at Epic Sports on-line for about $2.00 each). Place sticky side of Velcro on glove box - use another same size Velcro on top with sticky side out. Cut belt parts and press onto sticky side of Velcro! Works PERFECTLY! (doesn't lock, but have never used lock position) Just FYI!!!
 

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Dear Drozd, Shud have given some background. I'm a 62 year old female on disability benefits so low $$$. I have always worked on cars and helped rebuild an old Harley Sportster engine. Didn't have the strength to uninstall and reinstall new one and cudn't afford to pay Mini to do it so had to be resourceful thus using my creativity for fix. Hope that makes more sense.
 

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Thanks, Guys - knew you'd understand! I def miss working on cars!!! I did, however, recently fix low tire pressure reset button near ebrake (was getting tired of seeing light on dash controls)...tire pressure was fine (checked by a tire tech at no cost) and 2 different mechanics, one stating I needed a new sensor for $68, the other, same dx but over $100.00. Didn't buy into either of those options. Thot I'd try removing reset button small assembly, which I did, and kept pouring very, very small amounts of rubbing alcohol while pushing up and down reset button. IT WORKED!!! No more yellow light - and All Good at the cost of $1.50. I may be an 'old broad' but not a 'dumb broad' as some male mechanics might think!!! LOL!
 

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Rear left knob in glove box

My glove box seems free, 2005S, but the lower left rear of the compartment has a knob of some sort that turns around 90 degrees. There is a hose external of this knob that is a little hard to reach. The new glove box doesn't have this same attachment, but has some kind of cover over the hole. Need to investigate more but any help would be appreciated.
 

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That hose is attached to the A/C output. The thought was to make the glove box act like a refrigerator. You need to remove it from the old box and replace it (twist and pull from inside, to blow cold air in the glove box), otherwise it's no big deal to leave it detached, and let cold air blow behind the box.
 

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This is my first post here, so hope it goes well:

After reading up on the posts regarding broken glove box door latches, no one seems to have attempted to repair theirs fully. With a new glove box assembly running in the $200 range, I figured that I'd give it a go and if I broke it, well I'd have had to spend the $200 anyway. Their was a lot of concern on other post regarding the sonic welding of the inner and outer doors, but I've had some success with getting around this on other things.

My door was popping open at any bump, which wasn't too bad when alone but made passengers (and my wife when she drove the car) upset.

Here's what I did:

First, remove the glove box assembly. This is real easy. Removing five Torx screws frees it up. One on each side edge, two on the upper inside edge and one in the very back wall of the box. Label your screws as they are not all the same. Slide the box out until you can reach the light assembly. Looking from the top, you'll see a tab on one end that needs a little push to free it from its hole. Once it's out, wiggle it back through the hole and let dangle while you do the rest. The AC tube will drop to the floor when the box comes out.

Once the box is out, find a suitable workplace such as a workbench or your mom's dining room table. Put a towel down to catch any small parts from bouncing away. Remove the tensioner on the side using a hex key or luckily fitting flat screwdriver.


Remove the push nut on one end of the hinge rod by carefully prying it with a small flat screwdriver, working around the nut evenly. Once off, slide the rod out the other end. Don't worry about the white nylon inserts, as they seem pressed into their holes and don't come out.

Now, the fun part. The two halves are sonically welded together. Get a couple flat, strong wide objects to pry these apart. I used some wood chisels. Screwdrivers are too narrow and will damage the edges of the plastic. Insert one of the tools into the separation, and then the other next to it. By taking turns pushing one forward and one back, you'll eventually hear a pop or crack. Congrats! One weld broken and many more to go. Now just patiently start working around the perimeter until it seems the edge welds are all popped. Now get a little more enthusiastic and push harder, working around again. The interior welds will start popping. See the photos for locations of the welds and concentrate there. I count 34 or 35 welds.


I didn't know where or how many, so I just kept going. The very interior ones are tough. You just have to take a deep breath and pull the pieces apart. The plastic seems quite sturdy, so I didn't feel there was any danger of breaking it.

Viola! Two pieces. Once in there, you can see your latch and it's problem. Take some pics and note the position of all the pieces before disassembly! I didn't and it added half an hour to the job.

My latch was wobbly, and once in I saw that one side was broken.



Some standard five minute epoxy and care got the broken piece back in place.


I applied a fillet of glue along the breaks where it would not interfere with the latch pieces for additional strength.

Once it's all dry, reassemble the latch and put it back in place.

Make sure all the broken welds are clear of obstruction. Mix up a good quantity of 5 minute epoxy, and working quickly, put a dollop on each of the weld spots. Press the inner piece back in place, and weight it down. Go get a sandwich and when you're done you're ready to reinstall your door hinge rod. Slightly flatten the rod's push nut you took off, and press it back on using a socket slightly larger than the rod. Make sure the cone points out so it slides on easily.

Reinstall the tensioner.


Pop the light fixture back in, slide the box in place and replace the screws. Climb under and pop the AC tube back in place. Pat yourself on the back and go look for some bumps to test your work!
My glove box does not have any screws. They must all be covered. I can't find any way to remove it. My latch popped out of the unit and I'm trying to figure out how to put it back together correctly. I can get the hook back in but not functioning anymore. I am unable to find any videos on how to fix the latch. Can you possibly help? 2005 mini Cooper S.
 
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