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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have finally followed the well beaten trail & ditched the RF's on my MCS R53. Having run them down to the legal limit, all I can say is that the last few miles on wet roads were.......well interesting. Now I'm on 215/45/17 452's & as many have said before, it feels as though all the roads have been re-surfaced! The ride is firm still of course but no more of that incessant jiggle, no more appalling tramlining & I feel safe going over white lines again.

Still trying out various tyre pressues -currently on 35F 34R as suggested elswhere on the forum. What other options are folk trying??
 

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still learning
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interesting, how many miles did you get out of the original tyres ?

if I keep my cooper much longer I may do the same........................does it really make that much of a difference ?

do you carry a puncture kit ? and is so what one ?

thanks
 

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I have posted before on this topic, there is no benefit on having runflats, If you have a puncture and drive for any appreciable distance the tyre will be totaled, cost £120. If you have a puncture with standard tyres and have a Gung water soluble repair kit (cost £25) the tyre can be repaired for £5 and Gung replaced for £10. Runflats are NO safer and do not last as long as standard tyres. Another point is that the tyre sensor will not react on runflats until a pressure of about 6psi is reached, which means you could have been running around with an almost flat tyre for days as you cannot on runflats, tell the difference between a flat and a fully inflated tyre just by looking as the thick walls keep the tyre up. The sensor on standard tyres reacts at about 24psi, therefor you know when a tyre is loosing pressure. Water soluble gung has been used for years on new motor cycles for safety, new tyres are deflated and gung inserted, they are then re inflated, if the cyclist has a puncture the gung already in the tyre blocks the leak, the safety of this procedure is obvious.
 

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I have posted before on this topic, there is no benefit on having runflats, If you have a puncture and drive for any appreciable distance the tyre will be totaled, cost £120. If you have a puncture with standard tyres and have a Gung water soluble repair kit (cost £25) the tyre can be repaired for £5 and Gung replaced for £10. Runflats are NO safer and do not last as long as standard tyres.
I'd disagree. I drive through really rough areas to go to/from work at about 10.30 at night ... areas where a female is not safe to stop at night. Areas with big knife and gun problems on a nightly basis. And areas where, if I got a flat tyre, I'd continue driving, regardless. Runflats do help when you know you drive in places stopping for a flat is not safe. The difference is that continuing to drive home with runflats saves me the rim damage and possible axle damage. If it saves me being raped, stabbed, or shot, it's more than done its duty.
 

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Runflats are NO safer and do not last as long as standard tyres.
I totally disagree. Having experienced a complete pressure failure at motorway speed in the rain, I can tell you it is not s pleasent experience. I somehow managed to keep the car from hitting the central barrier before coming to rest facing the opposite way:eek:

Luckily it was the M62 and late at night, so the rood was empty. Had it been during the day, then this would have ended differently.

Like dakini says, sometimes it's more than losing a few extra £'s that's at stake.

Personally, I will put up with the extra running cost for peace of mind.
 

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I totally disagree. Having experienced a complete pressure failure at motorway speed in the rain, I can tell you it is not s pleasent experience. I somehow managed to keep the car from hitting the central barrier before coming to rest facing the opposite way:eek:

Luckily it was the M62 and late at night, so the rood was empty. Had it been during the day, then this would have ended differently.

Like dakini says, sometimes it's more than losing a few extra £'s that's at stake.

Personally, I will put up with the extra running cost for peace of mind.

Peace of mind is worth more than money . I wouldn't feel safe without runflats driving an MCS with no spare :aargh:Even with a spare wouldn't be able change it myself so runflats are a blessing :smile:
 

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I've just put my winter tyres and rims on (which usually heralds an unseasonable spell of warm weather :D). The rims are 15" alloys, and I am assured by the experts that you can't even get runflat winter tyres for 15"! So, either I upgrade to 16", or accept the risk of conventionals in winter. Funny thing is that this wheel/tyre combination was provided by my BMW/MINI dealer, who never mentioned that I should be considering 16" rims in order to benefit from winter runflats......

Confused moi?

Ian
 

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My sensor has gone off twice so far (had car from new, just over a year now) and both times it was nothing! I ended up driving over 100 miles each way under 50mph as that's what I read in the manual you need to do, and I found out afterwards it wasn't necessary!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
For the record, my MCS has done 36K miles. In that time is has consumed 2 sets of fronts & 1 set of rear runflats. I feel the difference in ride is substancial & worth the change. I understand anxieties about punctures but am prepared to take the risk given the type of driving/areas I drive in. I now carry a 'mini' compressor & an aerosol of foam to deal with any eventuality, hopefully
 

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I wish I had changed to non-runflats sooner as the difference to the handling and comfort is amazing. JCW now up for sale - gutted!
Yes it has to be admitted that the Dunlop Sport 01s are a bit hard riding but handling is perfectly acceptable if different from non runflats and like some of the posters above my view is that there is a huge bonus in ultimate security . You have to get used to the little quirks of runflats but once you've done that no problem. I get rather fed up with the incessant whingeing about runflats which has gone on for years. If you value a bit of softer ride more highly than your life, fine ,
but I don't.
 

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And yet, I have to believe that runflat technology has moved with the times! My latest Bridgestone runflats provide, IMHO, a better ride, better handling and certainly improved economy compared with my old Dunlops......
 

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I've just put my winter tyres and rims on (which usually heralds an unseasonable spell of warm weather :D). The rims are 15" alloys, and I am assured by the experts that you can't even get runflat winter tyres for 15"! So, either I upgrade to 16", or accept the risk of conventionals in winter. Funny thing is that this wheel/tyre combination was provided by my BMW/MINI dealer, who never mentioned that I should be considering 16" rims in order to benefit from winter runflats......

Confused moi?

Ian
Is there a true winter (i/e designed for snow and ice) runflat available at all? All-weather yes, but snow?
 

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I have posted before on this topic, there is no benefit on having runflats, If you have a puncture and drive for any appreciable distance the tyre will be totaled, cost £120. If you have a puncture with standard tyres and have a Gung water soluble repair kit (cost £25) the tyre can be repaired for £5 and Gung replaced for £10. Runflats are NO safer and do not last as long as standard tyres. Another point is that the tyre sensor will not react on runflats until a pressure of about 6psi is reached, which means you could have been running around with an almost flat tyre for days as you cannot on runflats, tell the difference between a flat and a fully inflated tyre just by looking as the thick walls keep the tyre up. The sensor on standard tyres reacts at about 24psi, therefor you know when a tyre is loosing pressure. Water soluble gung has been used for years on new motor cycles for safety, new tyres are deflated and gung inserted, they are then re inflated, if the cyclist has a puncture the gung already in the tyre blocks the leak, the safety of this procedure is obvious.
There is a value on it if you have a pucture that the goop can't fill. The person with run flats will drive on home while you call for a lift. As kini mentioned, it may could be a woman that really doesn't want to be stuck there in the first place. As for the pressure, I have seen regular tires that look OK when they are not. You should always check the pressure between fill-ups.

I guess the value depends on who you are and what you want in the way of security. Frankly I use run-flats for winter as I have no desire to be messing with goop in snow. Do I feel there is no benefit in having them? Absolutely not! You can't tell a person that there is no benefit on an item that could get them home safely.
 

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Rocking the F57
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Ahhh the good old runflat versus conventional tyre debate.....

At the end of the day, which ever tyre you fit gives you a trade off.... if you fit runflats, you must accept that the tyres give a harsher ride, do not offer as much grip (especially in the wet) and are expensive to replace.

On the flip side, while the conventional tyre offers better grip and handling, a better ride and cheaper purchase costs, you must accept that in the event of a blowout, you're pretty much stuffed!

So, if for instance the car was owned and being driven by my mother, she's going on 60, hasn't got a clue about tyre pressures or how to change/inflate a wheel, I'd make sure it had runflats - just for the piece of mind factor.

However, as the car is owned and run by myself, I'm 25, male and have a good knowledge of tyres and looking after them, I don't mind running the risk. I carry two cans of Holts tyre sealant and a compressor. However I do know that in the event of a catastrophic failure, I will end up on the hard shoulder waiting for the tow truck.

You pays your money, and takes your choice ;) :) :D

Now, to answer the OPs question, I'm currently running 36 psi front, 34psi rear on my 215/40 R17 Goodyear Eagle F1s.
 

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Ahhh the good old runflat versus conventional tyre debate.....

At the end of the day, which ever tyre you fit gives you a trade off.... if you fit runflats, you must accept that the tyres give a harsher ride, do not offer as much grip (especially in the wet) and are expensive to replace.

On the flip side, while the conventional tyre offers better grip and handling, a better ride and cheaper purchase costs, you must accept that in the event of a blowout, you're pretty much stuffed!

So, if for instance the car was owned and being driven by my mother, she's going on 60, hasn't got a clue about tyre pressures or how to change/inflate a wheel, I'd make sure it had runflats - just for the piece of mind factor.

However, as the car is owned and run by myself, I'm 25, male and have a good knowledge of tyres and looking after them, I don't mind running the risk. I carry two cans of Holts tyre sealant and a compressor. However I do know that in the event of a catastrophic failure, I will end up on the hard shoulder waiting for the tow truck.

You pays your money, and takes your choice ;) :) :D

Now, to answer the OPs question, I'm currently running 36 psi front, 34psi rear on my 215/40 R17 Goodyear Eagle F1s.
Exactly. As an example I have non-runflats on my MINI and, even though the only time I've suffered a puncture the gunk didn't work and I had to be towed home, I wouldn't go back to the runflats for all the reasons mentioned. Whereas my g/f has runflats on her ONE which allowed to get home after a puncture a few months ago and is quite happy with them
 

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Now what have I done????
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I don't suppose that BMW/MINI give their customers the option to choose between runflats and conventional tyres on a new car, do they?

I ask because, while the merits in case of a puncture are pretty clear, is there any measurable difference in the grip and stopping power between the 2 types under dry and wet conditions? Discussions on this and other threads suggest that runflats have inferior performance in some circumsyances - and I for one would like to know more.......so I can make a proper informed decision, based on all of the factors.

In my driving experience, I have had more occasions to worry about grip and stopping distances than about punctures.......but maybe I have been lucky (touch wood)

Ian
 

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Rocking the F57
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They do give you the choice Ian ;) Spec 15" wheels and you conventional tyres and a spare wheel, spec 16" or 17" wheels and you get runflats with no spare.

The new generation runflats (Dunlop Sport 01) are much better than the previous models used. The Dunlops were always the best ones, but the Pirelli [email protected] were terrible in the wet, especially when fitted to a Cooper S.

If I were buying a new Cooper S now, I actually wouldn't change the tyres until the standard runflats wore out, however when buying my 06 Cooper S, I ditched a good set of Pirelli runflats to have 'proper' tyres.
 
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