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They tell you these days that you don\'t need to run a car in anymore.

Whilst this is strictly true, if you want your engine to sound sweet and last a long time them you will take it easy.

This is what I did.

1st 100 miles
Never let the car labour in any gear.
Never take it above 3,500 revs.
Never \'put my foot down\'.

Next 1,000 miles
As above except 4,000 revs.

Next 1,000 miles
As above except 4,500 revs.
Started to put my foot down \'a little bit\'

Then
Go for it!!

My dealer had cause to drive my car the other week and commented on how sweet and stress free it sounded compared with his demonstrators that had been thrashed from day 1.

I have a Cooper \'S\' on order and will do exactly the same with that.
 

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Another nice thing to do...I do a new filter and oil after 1,000 miles; then 2,000 miles later (at 3,000) and every 3,000 after that. Also, don\'t leave synthetics in longer than regular oils; synthetics accumulate the same dirt and water that non-synthetics do.
 

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On 10-21-2001 22:59 kshapiro wrote:
Another nice thing to do...I do a new filter and oil after 1,000 miles; then 2,000 miles later (at 3,000) and every 3,000 after that. Also, don\'t leave synthetics in longer than regular oils; synthetics accumulate the same dirt and water that non-synthetics do.
Since the MINI has a computer minding the oil change schedule based upon actual driving habits, I\'ve got some questions for MINI owners (and owners to be)....

1. With the TLC package in the UK and the pre-paid maintenance in the US, are you going to let the computer tell you when you should take the MINI to the dealer for an oil change, or are you going to do it yourself more frequently?

2. If you plan on changing your MINI\'s oil yourself, how to do plan on updating the car\'s computer to inform it of the oil change? Skip it?

3. Based upon the second question, if you do you own oil changes and you don\'t reset your MINI\'s computer (as you likely won\'t have the means to do so), do you think you\'ll have \"warranty issues\" with the dealer or BMW as you will have out smarted your computer which may indicate that you\'ve ignored the instruction to change the oil?

I’ll bet this is an issue that hasn’t really come up before ---- I’m sure there are exceptions to this, but I would guess that the typical owner of a new BMW does not do his/her own oil changes. Are BMW dealers, (and BMW itself) ready to deal with MINI owners that might personally change the oil in their own cars themselves?

Clash of the BMW vs. MINI demographics?
 

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I will do what Peteb said I think.
 

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As much as I like to go all out in my Cooper S once I get it in my hands, I personally will not be inclined to push it to the limit as I shall 'baby' it and follow a strict break-in regime. (something along the lines of what peteb prescribed above). I do want my car to last a long while and maintained in top shape so its up to me to take care of it from the beginning. :rolleyes:

Originally posted by Coopergeezer
I was talking to my friend about running in cars. He works for BMW and drives them off the production line to test them. Apparently, they're ragged straight away and taken up to 100Mph. If the engine blows, it is replaced and retested. He says there is no real need to wear the engine in.
 

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I did more or less exactly the same as peteb except I also ran the car on Super Unleaded for the duration of the run in period.

The result-come 2000 miles I had one sweet sounding engine:D

I am going to do exactly the same with my S.
 

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Pbeirne transcribed the break-in, or run-in proceedure for his Canadian Launch Edition Cooper, right out of the manual here.

While not necessarily the last word, it is what MINI recommends.
 

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kshapiro said:
Another nice thing to do...I do a new filter and oil after 1,000 miles; then 2,000 miles later (at 3,000) and every 3,000 after that. Also, don\'t leave synthetics in longer than regular oils; synthetics accumulate the same dirt and water that non-synthetics do.
Please remember, most european cars are filled at the factory with a special break-in oil. It is much more viscous so it sticks to the parts, even through shipping overseas. It is hydroscopic, so it purposely absorbs any moisture that might be in the engine upon assembly, or through initial use. It is a mix of molecular densities, with the smallest molecules designed to treat bare metal, and the largest ones designed to prevent the oil burning as metal-to-metal surfaces seat themselves.

Basically, it is a very well engineered fluid containing much synthetic oil, but a whole lot more stuff, specifically designed to break-in an engine properly. It is also quite expensive.

Years ago, it was a good idea to get your first oil changes done quickly, but most manufacturers bench test, flush and treat their engines before they're sold.

To dump this fluid prematurely would not be in your car's best interest. Please search "break-in oil" on the forum or the internet in general, to learn more. While this advice is manufacturer-specific, and might not apply to certain North American vehicles, it probably applies to the MINI or any BMW. Can anyone confirm or deny?
 

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Break in period

I read on another board that someone with an S who has actually gotten it up over 5,000 miles said that once he hit the 5K mark the car seemed to have more horsepower in first and second gear.

This could explain why the S, even though it has 30% more horsepower, doesn't seem that much faster out of the gate than the regular Cooper. Could it possibly be that it is programmed into the chips to allow for a break-in period??

I don't know much about this stuff, so any explanations would be helpful.
 

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Every car loosens up with running-in (breaking-in). I would have doubted the car had this, but anything is possible. I mean, if it can change the red-line due to engine temperature and conditions, it could do this with the E-Gas pedal.

The real question is, did it become gradually more powerful, or did it just open up as soon as it ticked over 4,999 km. That would be pretty funny and cool if that were the case. There's certainly enough electronics on board to accomplish it.
 

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First drive is 500-mile trip home from dealer!

...Well, wait a moment. People have said that you should not let the new car linger in one gear-- but for half of us buying a MINI this year, the first time we drive it will be a 500-mile journey to our home town in another state! Is this drive going to be harmful to our new cars? We'll be in 6th gear at 70mph for five hours at a time. Will that behavior have an adverse affect on the life or performance of our cars?!
 

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Re: First drive is 500-mile trip home from dealer!

Wynn said:
...Well, wait a moment. People have said that you should not let the new car linger in one gear-- but for half of us buying a MINI this year, the first time we drive it will be a 500-mile journey to our home town in another state! Is this drive going to be harmful to our new cars? We'll be in 6th gear at 70mph for five hours at a time. Will that behavior have an adverse affect on the life or performance of our cars?!
Good point. And I've already planned for it. As I'll be getting my new Cooper S from a distant locale, I've already warned my wife that the first day or so of the trip home will definitely be off of the interstate highway system and instead will be on the backroads and in stop and go traffic through little towns. It will be well worth it to help make sure the engine is broken in properly. :D
 

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Re: First drive is 500-mile trip home from dealer!

Wynn said:
...the first time we drive it will be a 500-mile journey... Is this drive going to be harmful to our new cars? We'll be in 6th gear at 70mph for five hours at a time. Will that behavior have an adverse affect on the life or performance of our cars?!
Not really. Just follow the break-in proceedure. On your journey home, vary your speed, keeping the revs below 4500 rpm, and the speed below 95 mph. Do not use full-throttle or the 'kickdown' position at all.

For your first 200 miles, your tires will still have the mould release agent on them, and will be 'greasy'. Use caution, and allow extra stopping distance.

For the first 300 miles, avoid hard 'panic' braking. I mean, if you have to, you have to, but you could warp the rotors if you do before the pads seat themselves. Again, use caution and allow extra stopping distance. (And if you have to slam on the brakes, for god sakes do, because new rotors are cheaper than a front-end or a funeral).

Also for the first 300 miles, take it easy on your clutch. Allow the plates to seat themselves. Don't engage it hard, and don't ride it. (don't ride it anyways).

Overall, have a leasurely drive back, take it easy, don't bog the engine in any gear, and shift between 5th and 6th as you speed up and slow down every now and again.

Bruce also makes a good point. If you can slow your trip back a bit, and vary the type of driving, all the better. I'd say 'some' interstate isn't bad though. Best thing is to do a little of everything.
 
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