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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I bought my 2007 Cooper S in Sept 20 having never owned a Mini before. It was an absolute joy to drive and I was blown away by the acceleration. After I’d had it for a month, the engine warning light came on and the car went into restricted mode. Diagnostics didn’t find anything obvious but the error was cleared and the turbo was back. It then happened again but with no warning lights. The car was gutless, foot flat on the floor and barely moving. It was under warranty so the dealer took it to BMW who said it was the timing chain & replaced it. All good for another few weeks until I took it on a long drive after not being in it for a week over Christmas. Same problem again, no warning lights but hardly any power. After about 20 mins, I felt the turbo come to life & car was great again. It seems like it doesn’t like the cold (although it was sluggish this week in 9 degrees) & needs to be driven daily to stay happy. Please can anyone tell me if they’ve have this issue & what is the solution? I’m wondering if BMW didn’t even need to replace the timing chain as it hasn’t solved the problem completely. I really love this car & want to hold on to it but am starting to wonder if it’s worth it :(
 

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when they changed the timing chain did they fit new vanos sprocket have known these to fail and give boost fault codes, also the small vac pipes under the inlet manifold there is a tank these pipes can get oil on them and smell and give intermittent running issues as can divertor valve on turbo ,, without live data run when its doing would be hard to pin point
 

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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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first I would like to start by talking about a turbocharged car from the 1980's here in the U.S. It was the ford ford murkur xr4ti. This car came with the ford 2.3 liter engine and a turbocharger. Back then they did not even have intercoolers on cars from the factory. And they would heat soak. When they would heat soak it would produce low performance. Back then though aside of heavy timing the engine was the same 2.3 they run in other fords like the pinto, etc..
The engine was not turbo dependent like engines these days. The Mini Cooper turbo engines being the prime example the problem is the turbo charger. Whether it be obstructions in the intake sticky actuator arm. for which my solve was to bend the rod back into shape with a automotive bushing pick. It will buy you a little more time with your turbo charger. In the end it sounds like a new turbo charger is what you would need Or associated components the. The only other thing in my opinion that would be throttle based response as what you have described, would be the throttle body butterfly.
That can be checked by removing the cooled side turbo hose that connects to the intake manifold. Then to have someone start the car. When they press the start button foot on the brake the plastic throttle body butterfly with run through it's range of motion. At that point you can inspect to see if it's operation is normal and working order. It would open 180 degrees and close and open just a crack. It should be quite fast actually in doing so. Sometimes if gunk will get into the rod that holds the butterfly and make that sticky. Sometimes throttle body's fail all together; that's why they sell them. But either way it is something you can check for proper operation.
The turbo is a dicey deal The blow off valve housings that are plastic and to the inside on the cold side turbo can crack. The rubber in the gasket can become brittle and the springs are fairly weak and fail also.
The actuator can be bent back into place or a new one can be purchased.
This can buy some time. but the impeding point is gonna be turbo failure as the wastegate door lever the actuator is attached to will eventually loose it's geometry altogether and is welded to the door itself.
When replacing your actuator take a picture of where your actuator is presently positioned counting the threads on either side of the bolts and replace with the new one set up EXACTLY THE SAME amount of thread between the bolts. It's a good starting point. And more than likely the replacement will be a little weaker. So you may need to lessen the amount of threads between the bolt on the right side of actuator rod. But only go 180 degrees closer to the cold side of the turbo at a time and drive it.
Your not looking for horsepower increase your looking for it to act the way it was to begin with. I personally would not go less then 10 threads which translates to 10...360 degree turns. Your stock unit should have about 12 treads on the right side of the actuator rod as it is attached to the waste gate door lever.
 

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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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first I would like to start by talking about a turbocharged car from the 1980's here in the U.S. It was the ford ford murkur xr4ti. This car came with the ford 2.3 liter engine and a turbocharger. Back then they did not even have intercoolers on cars from the factory. And they would heat soak. When they would heat soak it would produce low performance. Back then though aside of heavy timing the engine was the same 2.3 they run in other fords like the pinto, etc..
The engine was not turbo dependent like engines these days. The Mini Cooper turbo engines being the prime example the problem is the turbo charger. Whether it be obstructions in the intake sticky actuator arm. for which my solve was to bend the rod back into shape with a automotive bushing pick. It will buy you a little more time with your turbo charger. In the end it sounds like a new turbo charger is what you would need Or associated components the. The only other thing in my opinion that would be throttle based response as what you have described, would be the throttle body butterfly.
That can be checked by removing the cooled side turbo hose that connects to the intake manifold. Then to have someone start the car. When they press the start button foot on the brake the plastic throttle body butterfly with run through it's range of motion. At that point you can inspect to see if it's operation is normal and working order. It would open 180 degrees and close and open just a crack. It should be quite fast actually in doing so. Sometimes if gunk will get into the rod that holds the butterfly and make that sticky. Sometimes throttle body's fail all together; that's why they sell them. But either way it is something you can check for proper operation.
The turbo is a dicey deal The blow off valve housings that are plastic and to the inside on the cold side turbo can crack. The rubber in the gasket can become brittle and the springs are fairly weak and fail also.
The actuator can be bent back into place or a new one can be purchased.
This can buy some time. but the impeding point is gonna be turbo failure as the wastegate door lever the actuator is attached to will eventually loose it's geometry altogether and is welded to the door itself.
When replacing your actuator take a picture of where your actuator is presently positioned counting the threads on either side of the bolts and replace with the new one set up EXACTLY THE SAME amount of thread between the bolts. It's a good starting point. And more than likely the replacement will be a little weaker. So you may need to lessen the amount of threads between the bolt on the right side of actuator rod. But only go 180 degrees closer to the cold side of the turbo at a time and drive it.
Your not looking for horsepower increase your looking for it to act the way it was to begin with. I personally would not go less then 10 threads which translates to 10...360 degree turns. Your stock unit should have about 12 treads on the right side of the actuator rod as it is attached to the waste gate door lever.
The actuator rod bends over time not in one lump sum. Getting a better purchase as bending more severely each time. due to the amounts of compression resistance inside the hot side of the turbo charger.
bending like, actuator rod through thrombosis in metallurgy of the rod itself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
when they changed the timing chain did they fit new vanos sprocket have known these to fail and give boost fault codes, also the small vac pipes under the inlet manifold there is a tank these pipes can get oil on them and smell and give intermittent running issues as can divertor valve on turbo ,, without live data run when its doing would be hard to pin point
Hi Mike, I wasn’t given the details of the work that BMW did as it was carried out for the dealers (who are v trustworthy btw)
They’re going to return it to BMW as it did the same thing today. Very little power then wham, turbo kicked in after 35 mins. V frustrating as I’d just like to be able to enjoy the car
 

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Hi Mike, I wasn’t given the details of the work that BMW did as it was carried out for the dealers (who are v trustworthy btw)
They’re going to return it to BMW as it did the same thing today. Very little power then wham, turbo kicked in after 35 mins. V frustrating as I’d just like to be able to enjoy the car
if that was in front of me i would do a vac smoke test first off this will check all vac lines for any leakages,, then i would do same to the inlet ie from turbo through to throttle body rules a boost pressure failure,,
would also if over 6 years and 60k replace the divertor valve just as piece of mind it also could be the issue.. once they know all these are good then its the can of worms and i have had them failed vanos sprocket basically it goes free wheel so dont hold the timing and when does this it will throw a boost fault code and send you off on a merry chase down the wrong hole ,,, so needs live data and read the vanos positions actual and prescribed when car is being driven ,,, no point doing this without driving it and the whole system runs as such ,, bmw garage will know all this and have the correct checks ,, also it would take a few hours to run these tests but to be honest its only correct way forward to do it and will save hundreds in long run from some people throw parts at them,,
 

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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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This is a vanos basic tutorial.
And given the attributes that come with VANOS. Having problems with idle,etc can be directly traced back to the unit itself. although VANOS has greatly changed from 1993 until now it's advantages are still the same.
 

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mini vanos work differently use a non return spring and a fix start position no cut gear wheel just rotation oil chambers that force oil to rotate the teeth sprocket independently of the centre boss ,, easy to know when at fault with diagnostics tool impossible to tell with out it,
 

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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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9 degree's do you have the cold weather pack intake manifold? That heats the plastic intake port on the manifold under a nice set of air tubes that run pvc gases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
9 degree's do you have the cold weather pack intake manifold? That heats the plastic intake port on the manifold under a nice set of air tubes that run pvc gases.
It’s just back from the garage again for its second fix under warranty. They think it was the oxygen pump so replaced that. It’s been on a very long trip & is running like a dream. Let’s hope I can finally enjoy the car now.
Quite a coincidence, it’s identical to the one used for the forum.
Thanks for all the advice. If the car plays up again, I’ll re read everyone’s tips.
 

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It’s just back from the garage again for its second fix under warranty. They think it was the oxygen pump so replaced that. It’s been on a very long trip & is running like a dream. Let’s hope I can finally enjoy the car now.
Quite a coincidence, it’s identical to the one used for the forum.
Thanks for all the advice. If the car plays up again, I’ll re read everyone’s tips.
oxygen pump you mean 02 sensor in exhaust system, or do you mean turbo charger, if 02 sensor might have cured the outcome and not the reason why failed is common on these engines or they run lean from valves leaking or oil burning and residue blocks up the holes on them,, tell tail sign is when removed they are dusty white perfect ones tends to grey in colour on a fresh motor ,,, hopefully just a worn out sensor time will tell
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
oxygen pump you mean 02 sensor in exhaust system, or do you mean turbo charger, if 02 sensor might have cured the outcome and not the reason why failed is common on these engines or they run lean from valves leaking or oil burning and residue blocks up the holes on them,, tell tail sign is when removed they are dusty white perfect ones tends to grey in colour on a fresh motor ,,, hopefully just a worn out sensor time will tell
Oops, yes I meant oxygen sensor. So far, so good with the new one 🤞
 

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2008 Mini Cooper S hatchback,Automatic,Mello Yellow
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That's really wonderful your car is running good. And that the mechanic replaced it and got it working for you. So nice to
have mechanic's actually fix something. It must restore your faith in the currency your using.
 
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