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OK, I've got a little over 6,000 miles on my MINI and the original all-season tires. I take it I'm a tad late for tire rotation, but since I have another semi-long trip coming up in the next week (that promises to be relatively nice weather-wise), I plan to rotate them prior to putting the snow tires on in a couple weeks.

My understanding is that the all-season tire rotation consists of straight swapping rear tires with front and vice-versa with no cross-overs. Is that correct? I'm sure I can find it somewhere, but what is the torque (in ft-lb) to be when I tighten down the lug nuts? Should I use any type of 'anti-seize' compound when tightening the lug nuts?

Thanks--happy Motoring!
 

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Torque settings are 140Nm. Tyre rotation? You should always have the tyres with the most grip on the rear of the vehicle but if you must swap them, then it should be on the same side particularly if you're running asymmetrics.
 

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Torque settings are 140Nm. Tyre rotation? You should always have the tyres with the most grip on the rear of the vehicle but if you must swap them, then it should be on the same side particularly if you're running asymmetrics.
Close but no coconut ;) . Asymmetrics can be swapped from side to side which is why car manufacturers prefer them. Directional tread patterns must stay on the same side. Having said that I agree you should stick to the same side regardless of tread pattern.
 

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Close but no coconut ;) . Asymmetrics can be swapped from side to side which is why car manufacturers prefer them. Directional tread patterns must stay on the same side. Having said that I agree you should stick to the same side regardless of tread pattern.
I would have had asymmetrics down as directional. Aren't they?
 

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I would have had asymmetrics down as directional. Aren't they?
Asymmetrics means the tryes have two halfs, one inside and one outside. Once a tyre fitter has mounted the tyre so the outer half of the tyre is on the outer half of the wheel you no longer need to concern yourself with where the wheel goes on the car. So in a factory they just have one pile of wheels with tyres already mounted. No mistakes can then be made. With directional you need to know which side the wheel will be fitted to in order to work out which way the wheel rotates as the tyres comes with rotational arrows. So in a factory there must be two piles of wheels, one for left and one for right and obviously they must be mounted on that side of the car. Mistakes are a lot more frequent. Aftermarket tyres are not such a hassle as the tyre fitter is doing one set at a time with the car in front of them so it's rare to confuse the issue. So there are a lot more directional aftermarket tyres where the benifits of directional tread outweigh possible mistakes. It is very rare to have a factory fresh car with directionals unless you are used to buying Ferraris and Lambos.
 
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