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Discussion Starter #1
I've read on a few posts now about the CVT "learning" your behavior, and adapting its performance accordingly.

What exactly is it "learning"?

I'm adapting to learning how to drive CVT-style, so I'm wondering if me learning it, while it's learning me, will results in massive confusion on both our parts? :D

Seriously - is it the timing between braking and acceleration at stop? Or your favorite throttle position range?
 

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I re-"stuck" an FAQ thread that we started working on earlier. Some of your questions may be partially answered there. We can also build it out further: CVT FAQ
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Okay, I found this on one of the threads you posted above:

valnmike said:
What is involved in a software update on a CVT equipped MINI?

The software upgrade is sort of a lengthy process because it involves driving the car a couple of times by dealer service personnel to synchronize the CVT clutches. If your dealer knows what is doing, the update is not limited just to re-programming the DME (engine and other systems control computer), but also to add new Motronic (a Bosch trademark, a company used by BMW for engine software) code, align EWS (Engine immobiliser), clear adaptation or 'learning' settings for the transmission and road test the car a few times to allow the system to re-learn driving patterns.

When a CVT car has had this software upgrade the service technician has to carry out a road test which can take up to 45 minutes and 15 miles to do so the cars clutch set point's are all self learned again.(Drive program)

They then :
1, Reset clutch adaptation values,
2, Carry out clutch adaptation,
3, Set-up clutch ratio adaptations,
4, Carry out a software reset
5, Clear adaptation values in the DME/EMS2000 Control unit.

The car sticks in 1st gear until it learns its set point/ratio's when it then selects 2nd gear and so on. There is a special way to do this but telling anyone on here would have no benefit at all...e.g. holding between certain rev thresholds etc etc...very boring!

This answer was taken from other mini2.com posts by cooper4us & here2help
So, I guess this begs the question - I took deliery of my MINI with 15 miles on it. I'm assuming that either the dealer, or the factory used at least some of these miles to do the above. So I start driving it home, and am getting used to the CVT for the first time. Subjectively, I didn't think it had changed any of its behavior since the first mile I drove it. Does this mean that after this procedure is done, it "stops" learning? And that nothing I do from now on will change it? What if the guy who tested the vehicle drives completely differently than me? Can I get it "reset" to learn MY habits? What if I was such a doofus driving the first 100 miles or so, and now that I've gotten better, can I get my MINI to "forgive and forget" and learn me all over again? :)

Wow, the more I learn, the more questions I have!
 

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plantain said:
I'm assuming that either the dealer, or the factory used at least some of these miles to do the above.
I can only assume "Yes", but I've wondered how this specific detail is managed in Manufacturing and the Delivery process.

It takes perhaps two (2) miles to reset the clutch adaptation and the transmission (ratio) adaptation. It is a very specific MINI-approved process: gentle acceleration to 37mph (60Km/h) in Drive, then coasting (foot off the throttle pedal) until the EMS2000 computer tracks CVT Input shaft speed versus Output shaft speed at specific "mapped" Engine rpm. These targeted rpm values are 5000, 4500, 4000, 3500, 3000, 2500, 2000, 1900, 1800, 1700, 1600, 1500, and 1400rpm.

This is called the "fast adaptation procedure" which removes an "X" from the displayed "D" (as in "XD"), or "SD", or "1" etc. The car is not supposed to be released until this process is completed in the computer, evidenced by the normal display of "D", "SD", and the Steptronic gears.

Once this is completed, then a "lifetime adaption strategy" will commence. It takes something like forty five (45) miles for this part of the adoption process to be completed. This is what has been called "learning" how you drive the individual car. The car tailors itself to your style, in small ways. You won't end up with a dud, but you may get a more responsive set of behaviors if you drive more "responsively" during this period.

Do NOT alter the break-in procedure to do any of this!

We have a whole break-in discussion somewhere here on MINI2 (can someone please supply that link into this thread?); follow that as your first priority. You will eventually get a software update, after break-in, that resets all of this fast adaption and lifetime adaption as part of the update, or you can request it.

Questions are a very good thing. You're certainly not a "doofus" for asking! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the detailed info!

Wow, that is pretty specific info. I wish I could learn more about that - it sounds like a pretty neat process, and I'm wondering what the tolerances are per parameter, and how vastly different one car can be from another. I suppose I'd find out if I got a MINI loaner some day if I were to take my car in for service.

I'm not sure if I'm getting used to the MINI, or it changed for me, but I do think I'm getting slightly better at smoothing out the downshifting when stopping. It used to feel pretty harsh; now I can feel it, but it doesn't feel as rough, and even seems more normal compared to cars I've driven before. I've also convinced myself that maybe the car is "hesitating" less when I take off from a stop. At least, I don't notice any appreciable lag when trying to take off while turning into traffic, for example.

I do know I've gotten spoiled - that ultra smooth acceleration onto freeways seems so natural, that when I drove my parents' SUV the other day, it felt strange feeling the car have to shift gears to get up to speed! :)
 

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So are you saying the lifetime mapping occur within the first 45 miles and then it's set for good?!
 

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plantain said:
it felt strange feeling the car have to shift gears to get up to speed!
Appropriate appreciation of an older technology's shortcomings. :D
 

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Cooper76 said:
So are you saying the lifetime mapping occur within the first 45 miles and then it's set for good?!
Roughly, yes; at least that's what I've been told. There is continuous monitoring of the system by the EMS2000, and apparently some adjustments to the map, even after the first 45 miles but the major "learning" occurs soon after the reset.

I was told the the first sixty miles after a software update should be viewed as "time for fun"; full throttle starts, hot onramp merging, ... but I'd still like to understand exactly what gets changed, how far these changes can deviate from some normalized map, what gets affected, etc. ie., If I drive it like mad (to get a performance set of learned behaviors), do I give up fuel economy for all miles driven (I think "no" is the answer)?

This "lifetime adaption strategy" is restarted, reset, when software updates are performed. This is why you shouldn't get nuts about any of this during the Break-in Period. Drive the car as it should be broken in, first priority.
 

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software updates

Hope it's OK, to tag on this question... Are software updates something that one's service department will automatically do, when one brings the MINI in for it's scheduled maintenance?

I'm embarassed to admit that at about 17,000 plus miles, I don't even really know - besides my next oil change which doesn't appear to be for about 7,000 more miles - when my scheduled maintenance is! :eek: Guess I'd better dig out my owner's manual.
 
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